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I would of course check with Douglas Pipher who has acces to the Selmer archives and can tell you with certainty.
 

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I know the seller. He's legit. If he says Selmer only made 10 C sopranos, he probably researched it.
Hi Saxtek, I am not questioning the seller, everything looks perfectly right on the pics, it’s only I didn’t know about Selmer’s C sopranos, I have seen this one posted on facebook, and another guy, posted there, he has another one in silver, and he said it plays beautifully.
Very interesting, I would really like to try one of these, I play C soprano daily (King) and love the tone of it.
 

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Beautiful instrument, the serial number puts it at 1956. so it is right at the cross-over from SBA to MK-VI
Numerically it would seem that way but in fact they are not really crossovers (mostly). MK VI for soprano really starts around 70k. I have a 73k and that is one of the very earliest MK VI. Before that they are mostly just straight SBA.
 

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Numerically it would seem that way but in fact they are not really crossovers (mostly). MK VI for soprano really starts around 70k. I have a 73k and that is one of the very earliest MK VI. Before that they are mostly just straight SBA.
Was the SBA Bb soprano also keyed to Eb, without a B bis key? This C soprano seems to be a quite old design. It makes perfect sense, because C sopranos are so marginal that all the C sopranos Selmer has ever produced have certainly been made with the same tooling.

Edit: to answer my own question (!), even the modèle 26 soprano (1927) was keyed to high F and had a B bis key. This C soprano is in fact designed like an enlarged sopranino.
 

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Texted with Paul Cohen about it today - he has one in silver.
 

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This isn't specific to the C soprano, but are there really any differences between BA/SBA and Mark 6 sopranos? We all know about the differences amongst those models in alto tenor and baritone, but to me the M6 soprano looks like a design from 1930 except for the octave key mechanism. But I have very limited exposure to Selmer sopranos.
 

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I am the owner/player of the other Selmer SBA C soprano. I call it a Mark VI era soprano although it technically is an SBA. It is a terrific instrument (and came with an original Selmer C* C soprano mouthpiece!) and is my second best C soprano. It has much in common with both my SBA Bb soprano and my 90xxx Mark VI straight soprano (which is one of the best Bb sopranos I own). Mine has a bis key, and also only keyed to Eb. View attachment 242030 View attachment 242032
Paul Cohen
 

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I forgot to mention that the serial number is #773xx, which blurs the distinction between SBA and Mark VI production. But Doug tells me it is still an SBA. If Doug says SBA, then its an SBA!
Paul Cohen
 

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I am the owner/player of the other Selmer SBA C soprano. I call it a Mark VI era soprano although it technically is an SBA. It is a terrific instrument (and came with an original Selmer C* C soprano mouthpiece!) and is my second best C soprano. It has much in common with both my SBA Bb soprano and my 90xxx Mark VI straight soprano (which is one of the best Bb sopranos I own). Mine has a bis key, and also only keyed to Eb. View attachment 242030 View attachment 242032
Paul Cohen
I don't see a B bis key on the picture that you provide -but of course I believe you when you claim that it has one.
 

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This isn't specific to the C soprano, but are there really any differences between BA/SBA and Mark 6 sopranos? We all know about the differences amongst those models in alto tenor and baritone, but to me the M6 soprano looks like a design from 1930 except for the octave key mechanism. But I have very limited exposure to Selmer sopranos.
Are there differences? Yes, definitely. The SBA has physical differences; smaller pearls, left facing octave lever, sometimes extra low Bb plateau. There are also differences in response and sound; SBA has a significantly smaller sound/air column, very very pretty sound but less spread and loud as MK VI.
 

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I own a Conn C sop that has a gorgeous tone. Would love to compare to a Selmer C some day.

[Also... you'd think for a $17k listing the seller would take time to post more than 10 mediocre photos rotated the wrong way. Maybe that adds to the mystique?]
 

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I forgot to mention that the serial number is #773xx, which blurs the distinction between SBA and Mark VI production. But Doug tells me it is still an SBA. If Doug says SBA, then its an SBA!
Paul Cohen
I have a 73xxx soprano and that is solidly a MK VI, no doubt on that. At least for soprano 77xxx should easily be MK VI but I am not clear on C soprano changes.
 

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I don't see a B bis key on the picture that you provide -but of course I believe you when you claim that it has one.
You need to (literally) triple click on the picture. Once to bring it into a separate window, second time to bring it to its own window and the third time to enlarge to original size. Hopefully that'll work for you! By the way, the Bis key is definitely there.......it's metal.

What a gorgeous horn, Paul!
 

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You need to (literally) triple click on the picture. Once to bring it into a separate window, second time to bring it to its own window and the third time to enlarge to original size. Hopefully that'll work for you! By the way, the Bis key is definitely there.......it's metal.

What a gorgeous horn, Paul!
Now, I can see it -thank you.
 
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