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I have fallen of the wagon with my practicing and trying to get back on. I guess I've gotten a bit rusty as I am just fumbling around the horn, no endurance, no coordination, and I cannot get my fingers to move fast enough.

When you sit down with your horn, what is your practice routine? What do you warm up with and for how long? What do you play on a daily basis? Etc?

What all would you suggest?

Thank you all =)
 

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I try to work out my priorities with my instructor each week. Each practice session I'll probably be working on scales, a new song or two, and long tones, but these things vary, so I divide things up into manageable chunks and go from there. I also set a time limit. I know me, and I'd play all day if I could.

Sometimes I get really frustrated, and I'm learning to just _stop_ and go on to something else, or take a short break until I can re-gather my wits. Then the fun comes back. I really do love to practice. And when I can keep my mind open and uncloudy, things come so much more easily. For me.
 

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Well, I'm old so the routine is simple.
A couple of slow scales to get the horn warm.
Then a couple more played faster followed by thirds and arpeggios to get the blood flowing in the fingers.
I might do an etude or 2 to get the mind focused, and then on to the "Butt Kicker Du Jour".

I'm between shows right now, so most of my practice time is just plain playing for fun.
I pull out all of the stuff that I keep for beginner students and let my heart lead me.
One day it might be easy classical S&E stuff, the next it might be Disney play alongs. :)
 

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I have an exercise which I have developed based on chromatically ascending and descending minor thirds. I also practice freeform improvisations and record them for evaluation later.
 

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I just pick it up and start playing. After a few minutes I've usually got my brain focused and my embouchure pumped. At that point, I go into whatever concepts or tunes - or both - that I'm working on. I think it's always important to have a bit of an organic component to the practice session; so even if I've got things I'm specifically working on, I always allow myself to venture into things that I feel like exploring.

Randy
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Denial (10 min)
Anger (10 min)
Bargaining (15 min)
Depression (10 min)
Acceptance (15 min)
Jamming (1 hour)
 

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Denial (10 min)
Anger (10 min)
Bargaining (15 min)
Depression (10 min)
Acceptance (15 min)
Jamming (1 hour)
Been there, done that, bought the T-shirt. Fortunately, I can do a bit more than this most of the time.

For my alto and tenor:

The usual long tones (3-10 minutes depending on mood/time available)
Scales and/or stuff from the Teal technique book
Ferling etudes (both major and minor) in the key signature of the day
Then whatever I need to work on. If nothing in the immediate queue, it's 20-30 minutes of Aebersold. OR...something fun.

For soprano:
Practice? Yes, I know I should but....
 

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midnightkat, glad you want to start playing again with a routine. What I do is a couple of scales and then long tones for a couple of minutes. Then I play to about 15-20 backing tracks. I like to work with a method book several times a week for about 10-20 minutes. I have a bunch of them so I just rotate through them. My practice takes about an hour and a half. I do it five or more times a week.

I recommend finding a genre of music that you like and find some play along books. Hal Leonard has some outstanding play along books.

Happy playing,
 

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60 to 90 minutes on clarinet Longtones, all major and melodic minor scales, tonguing exercises, arpeggios, work out of Melodious and Progressive etudes
30 minutes alto. Set embouchure with low notes, over tones, some tech work. Either do a ferling or Greg fishman etude.
30 minutes on tenor . Whatever tim has me working on but this week Donna Lee and IGR changes in three keys.
I always have way more to do than time so I try to focus and not mess around. Also, I ignore easy stuff. If I can do it why practice it.
But bare in mind that this is all aimed at what I want to do. 1. teach clarinet, play choro music 2. Be able to read and play alto at a higher level and 3. Be a better soloist on tenor . If I had an RnB gig coming up with a new band I'd spend alot of time on V7s and Blues scale work. Just what I'm doing now , I'm sure it will change. K
 

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first i do longtones on the Eb, Gb, and Bb arpeggios (dunno why, that's just what i was taught) throughout the whole range of the horn, and then i do it again, but bending the note as much as i can, both slowly and rapidly, like an exaggerated vibrato. then i work on the overtone series. this takes about fifteen minutes, and it's what i consider to be my warmup. i usually do scales after, but i don't count that as part of the warmup.
 

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After I am comfortable with a glass of water and no distractions (which is good while practicing), I start with long tones and embouchure. Then I practice scales of all kinds and their arpeggios/series. Next I open my Real Book to a random page and play through until perfect (hoping it lands on Some Skunk Funk but not directing towards s in particular). I repeat this twice more. Then I take a 20 minute break. When I come back from the break I put together everything I have learned in the session and jam for a solid 30 minutes. I will admit that the last step is sometimes put first and on some occasions the only step.
 

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Well, my warm-up routine can take the better part of an hour and I posted all about that in your other thread. The best advice I can give to anyone who's missed a few days, weeks, months, etc. is not to go to bed without putting air through the horn. Make sure you get some long tones and dexterity drills in every day, even if it's only 15 minutes. Force yourself to do the 15 minutes and if you're just not feeling it, put it down happy in the knowledge that you've improved today and will have a better time tomorrow. It really is that simple.
 

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Well, my warm-up routine can take the better part of an hour and I posted all about that in your other thread. The best advice I can give to anyone who's missed a few days, weeks, months, etc. is not to go to bed without putting air through the horn. Make sure you get some long tones and dexterity drills in every day, even if it's only 15 minutes. Force yourself to do the 15 minutes and if you're just not feeling it, put it down happy in the knowledge that you've improved today and will have a better time tomorrow. It really is that simple.
Dan. I think your thoughts on this are well put!

My personal practice sessions start with listening for about an hour. Transcribing or playing along picking up new licks and phrasing ideas, and then spending two hours working on charts I am going to be performing that week all the while recording myself so I can review it.

B
 

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I'm in my second year of alto lessons so it's 12 scales and diatonic harmony every other day along with major 6ths and 7ths chords and whatever songs are in my book for that week.
 
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