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III7, the V7 of vi

or Imaj7#11

just a word on nomenclature but an E dominant 7 with a 9 would be written E9. The 9 implies the 7. E7+9 makes me think of either augmented chords, sometimes written E+, or and E add9, which lacks a 7. Similarly, a 13 chord would be written E13 and would included the 1 3 5 b7 9 13. You could throw an 11 in there too but make sure its raised! Threadjack concluded.
 

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G major because I play enclosures at 120 bpm in 16 notes on it and then I feel like I'm finally begin to sound bebop^^
 

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III7, the V7 of vi

or Imaj7#11

just a word on nomenclature but an E dominant 7 with a 9 would be written E9. The 9 implies the 7. E7+9 makes me think of either augmented chords, sometimes written E+, or and E add9, which lacks a 7.
That's right, this is very ambiguous to see E7+9. It should be something like E9+ or E7(#9) depending on which chord it is meant to be.
 

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My favorite dominant chord is (whatever)13b9 because it kind of implies the relative minor and it can lends itself to Louis Armstrong-esque stuff. In general, I like common chords when I'm soloing, but I like a good spicy chord to end a song like minor major 9 or maj13(#11). I also like pedal points because they are great for building tension.
 

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Yikes guys, I dont know what half of that stuff is! There comes a point for me when its easier to think slash chords instead of all those extensions and alterations...

One of the funnest harmonies to play over is that second chord of the blues. Its very easy to play anything there so long as you make it very clear what that anything is.
 

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Yikes guys, I dont know what half of that stuff is! There comes a point for me when its easier to think slash chords instead of all those extensions and alterations...
Initially, but thinking in slash chords does not help so much i understanding the functional harmony.

I thought about this question, and I realised that trying to do that focussed on the minutiae of one chord at one point of time in a solo. A favourite chord would imply it is one that I play my best licks on, and that negates my ideal concept of thinking of a solo holistically, i.e. as part of a whole composition. It should be something that tells a story, or adds to the meaning of the tune. If I'm playing away and thinking "ooh, I can't wait to get to that G7 b10 b13 so I can play me altered scale, then I think I've actually lost the plot of why I play in the first place.
 

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My favorite dominant chord is (whatever)13b9 because it kind of implies the relative minor and it can lends itself to Louis Armstrong-esque stuff.
Probably a bone-headed question, but I don't get how you mean this. I'd most likely reach for a trusty HW diminished scale on that change -- I'm not getting how the relative minor reference works here.

Along the lines (I think) of what Pete says above, a BIG part of what would make a chord feel like a "favorite" to me is what chord it's going to. Which at least suggests that for me my favorite chord is going to be one functioning as a tension chord seeking release. And at this point I'm gonna call it as 4 bars of G7sus(b9) resolving to C∆, and hope for the best...
 

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A chord that doesn't move too fast.
 

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Probably a bone-headed question, but I don't get how you mean this. I'd most likely reach for a trusty HW diminished scale on that change -- I'm not getting how the relative minor reference works here.
Not at all!
G13(b9): G B D F Ab E
The third, flat ninth, and thirteen make E Ab B, which is and E major triad (Ab and G# being enharmonic) which is V in the key of A minor. (V/vi) I have experimented with playing b half diminished E7 am over dm G7 C (basically, the ii V i of the relative minor). These progressions are close enough to sound "correct" when swapped, but different enough to sound "hip" to my ears. The E7 implies G7(b9)13, or perhaps the G7(b9)13 implies E7(b9 #9). Either way, I like the connection between these chords, and I like exploiting these possibilities. Also, 13 chords remind me of Louis Armstrong's tried and true arpeggio: D F A C E over d minor G7 so that the E falls on G7.

A favourite chord would imply it is one that I play my best licks on, and that negates my ideal concept of thinking of a solo holistically
I think this is a negative and self-limiting way of looking at this topic, pieced with an excellent nugget of wisdom. Having a favorite chord to play over could also imply that you understand and enjoy the chord's sound and role in the music. When a song has your favorite chord in it, you know what to do to milk that musical moment because it is special to you as the player. Songs with lots of juicy chords present these opportunities to the player, while songs with simple chords present a different set of opportunities (like crafting a simple linear phrase, or playing bluesy lines, etc.). I like how you mention the importance of thinking of a solo holistically, because a solo should be a unified statement, but that shouldn't prevent the soloist from enjoying any stops along the way.
 
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