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So I can play a G above the staff and if i drop my jaw enough it kind of produces a growl kind of effect with the G below it. I think this is a technique i was just wondering the name was?

Thanks in advance,

eRock
Yani A901. C* V16 (3)
 

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Carbs said:
I think it is called Growling
No - it's not. What you are doing is simply getting the vibrations of the reed so that it produces a pitch in two different octaves - it has to do with the overtone series. Growling is singing or humming a pitch while playing notes.
 

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gary said:
No - it's not. What you are doing is simply getting the vibrations of the reed so that it produces a pitch in two different octaves - it has to do with the overtone series. Growling is singing or humming a pitch while playing notes.
Isn't that called a "multiphonic"?
 

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I think the effect is a multiphonic. From what I understand a growl is a type of multiphonic but not every multiphonic is a growl.
This specific effect is a multiphonic, no humming\singing involved.
 

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Same as an overtone right?
 

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No, but they are related.

An overtone is a single tone.

A multiphonic occurs when you produce two tones at once. You may produce multiphonics by accident when practicing overtones. Once you can create them with control and consistency, you can use them for effect. At least one of the tones in the multiphonic is an overtone. Sometimes both of them are.

I think the term "split tone" also refers to a multiphonic. But, as I understand it, that term is usually used when talking about high-register multiphonics a la Sanborn and Brecker.
 

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A multiphonic can happen on ANY cross vented note or through emphasizing harmonics on a single non-cross vented note. Those are really 2 completely different techniques, although they use similar lip/throat combinations.
 

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Growling on a saxophone, unlike on a trumpet or brass instrument, does not produce two tones. You're playing a multiphonic. They're not the same thing. The more specific term for what you're doing called splitting the note, which creates the multiphonic. On the saxophone, another way to create the multiphonic is to change your voicing and alter your fingering to include strange combinations of fingers. One example is

play an E (123, 12) and then add RSK 1 and pinky C#, mess with your voicing enough to get the two tones to come out.

That is a multiphonic, not a growl.
 

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Growling is just a disrupted airstream.
 
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