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I saw this on an eBay ad. Key beside the right hand thumb, looks like it may connect to the low C:

s-l1600.jpg

This is a new one on me. The horn was a really old French made Triebert.
 

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Looks to be connected to the low C. Perhaps a C/D trill key? Not that I think it would be any easier to trill with my thumb vs. my pinkie...
 

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Isn’t this a Low Eb trill?

Is this like a Pierret? I have seen strange things on ld Pierrets.
 

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Looks to be connected to the low C. Perhaps a C/D trill key? Not that I think it would be any easier to trill with my thumb vs. my pinkie...
I mostly agree. I think that you would be able to trill by operating the Eb key, instead of the low C key.
 

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I mostly agree. I think that you would be able to trill by operating the Eb key, instead of the low C key.
I wish it was some long lost mech that auto opened the C# when D was fingered, thus for ever ridding the instrument of the stuffy D. I`ve often thought this would be possible and the right hand thumb would be the perfect digit for the job.
 

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I wish it was some long lost mech that auto opened the C# when D was fingered, thus for ever ridding the instrument of the stuffy D. I`ve often thought this would be possible and the right hand thumb would be the perfect digit for the job.
On my instruments though, playing D with C# open is a pretty unstable note, and wants to warble if I'm not careful.
 

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There were several Noblet with two low C keys opening simultaneously to correct intonation
 

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I wish it was some long lost mech that auto opened the C# when D was fingered, thus for ever ridding the instrument of the stuffy D. I`ve often thought this would be possible and the right hand thumb would be the perfect digit for the job.
Be careful what you wish for. The Holton Rudy Wiedoeft model had an extra low C# tonehole that was continuously open to add venting to the D. It was supposed to close by closing the low C. This is what Eric Brand had to say about the mechanism in his Band Instrument Repair Manual.

If ever there were changes made on saxophones, the Holton Company made them. What would normally seem to be changes for the better. made this saxophone in the past seem like a farce. The high Eb trill key put out by the Holton Company with the advent of
their Rudy Weidoft Model was a museum piece. Their attempt of clarification of the middle D by the insertion of the C auxiliary tone hole was. without question, the worst key arrangement that could possibly be conceived by the minds of men.

Their G# trill lever was, without any doubt, one of the biggest mistakes ever made by any saxophone company. The insertion of an extremely long rod to hold the Eb trill lever and the high E key was undoubtedly a horrible mistake in saxophone planning.
However, the more recent Holton instrument, although it cannot be considered among the finest in the professional field, has made such fine improvements that it ranges as one of the top instruments for the amateur student lines.
Don't hold back Eric. Tell us how you really feel. :)

Holton Sax.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Isn’t this a Low Eb trill?

Is this like a Pierret? I have seen strange things on ld Pierrets.
I read in another thread that Triebert was a Cousenon brand. I have no idea what the key does. Someone already bought the horn, if they are member here maybe they will post about it.
 

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It would make it easier to change (and especially to tremolo) between Eb & C. Pinky would not have to slide across from one touchpiece to another.
 

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Be careful what you wish for. The Holton Rudy Wiedoeft model had an extra low C# tonehole that was continuously open to add venting to the D. It was supposed to close by closing the low C. This is what Eric Brand had to say about the mechanism in his Band Instrument Repair Manual.

Don't hold back Eric. Tell us how you really feel. :)

View attachment 214946
That two tone hole layout to vent D is exactly what I have on my Noblet/Beaugnier bass sax. Seems to work fine mechanically. I certainly would not characterize it so negatively, not when there exist things like the three-four-balanced springs and teeter-totter lever octave key mechanisms; or 9 different keys on bassoon all to be operated by one thumb; or the very old Conn 2-side-keys-open-3 holes for the side Bb, side C, and high E; or the Dolnet tenor with the (seems like) 1.5 mm diameter key rods for maximum flexibility and impossibility to achieve a stable adjustment; or the Bundy pivoting rubber pads; or the Martin Typewriter sax with no rollers or spatula keys, just pearls...

Shall I continue?
 

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That two tone hole layout to vent D is exactly what I have on my Noblet/Beaugnier bass sax. Seems to work fine mechanically. I certainly would not characterize it so negatively, not when there exist things like the three-four-balanced springs and teeter-totter lever octave key mechanisms; or 9 different keys on bassoon all to be operated by one thumb; or the very old Conn 2-side-keys-open-3 holes for the side Bb, side C, and high E; or the Dolnet tenor with the (seems like) 1.5 mm diameter key rods for maximum flexibility and impossibility to achieve a stable adjustment; or the Bundy pivoting rubber pads; or the Martin Typewriter sax with no rollers or spatula keys, just pearls...

Shall I continue?
Yaaay, Little by little, I learn more of the "why" of those two conjoined C keys on my Beaugnier/Leblanc Vito bari!!!!
 

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For reason of intonation because they needed a larger hole that it was possible in the bow.

Noblet made this also on baritone. I had one long ago.
 

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..or the Bundy pivoting rubber pads..
I remember those working well? I've looked for a fixer. Curiosity makes me want one. I borrowed one for nearly a whole season while my horn needed repair. Almost bought it, because it played so accurately, easily and had a vibrant tone, but I decided to fix mine. What was the downer for the floating rubber pads?
 
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