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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2014
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Conn transitional just behind the New Wonder II.
 

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Mine — 251xxx — has no engraving at all. These are still one of the best tenors ever made. The HUGE TONE is to die for. Selmer aficionados whinge about the "ergos" — but there's nothing wrong with the ergos, except that they're very different from Selmer's. As another poster said above, this is an example of a Transitional tenor, with production moving from the NW II to the 10M Artist. The high side E key is raised at an angle and sculpted to fit the RH index finger. This was one of the first changes made to the NW II. By the way, the NW II tenor is often called a "Chu"; however, that's a misnomer, because Leon "Chu" Berry didn't play an NW II; the horn he made his name playing, the horn which he'd bought on hire purchase and which he was still paying off when he was killed in a horrific car crash was one of these.
 

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That would be an example of the lowest cost finish - probably plain clear lacquer. The engraving was typically minimal. It's the silver and gold plated ones that typically have the more elaborate engraving. Interestingly enough all the nickel plated ones I've seen also have very simple engraving. I wonder if the thickness of Ni plating makes elaborate engraving pointless?
 

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Until 1933, bare brass (lacquered after 1929) or nickel plated Conn saxes had only the name brand engraved.

During 1932 the script style name changed to modern gothic capitals (see pontius' horn upthread).

About 255xxx s/n, a simplified Naked Lady design appears, used till about 270xxx when it became more elaborate.
 

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I am a little confused about the vintage of that horn, according to the Conn-Selmer breakdown https://www.conn-selmer.com/en-us/resources/serial-numbers/cg-conn-instrument-serial-numbers anything with an M prefix is 1969, what am I missing?
Around 1962 the serial numbers were almost 7 digits and they started anew with letters for the years in front of the numbers. There are also some horns with 4 digit numbers at that time. The M in front of the vintage numbers indicated saxophones whereas N was for clarinets, O for flutes, etc.
 

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Around 1962 the serial numbers were almost 7 digits and they started anew with letters for the years in front of the numbers. There are also some horns with 4 digit numbers at that time. The M in front of the vintage numbers indicated saxophones whereas N was for clarinets, O for flutes, etc.
Thanks Bruce! Drinkware Automotive tire Gas Kitchen appliance Drink


So then this means B=Bass
M (saxophone) S# = 1926
L low pitch?

That 'M" got me confused with "m" but this explains why I could never figure out why all my Conns were 1969... DUH... Brainfart!
:(:(
 

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Thanks Bruce! View attachment 255180

So then this means B=Bass
M (saxophone) S# = 1926
L low pitch?

That 'M" got me confused with "m" but this explains why I could never figure out why all my Conns were 1969... DUH... Brainfart!
:(:(
To add to the confusion, They used the letters like S, C, A, T, B (for bari and bass) until after WWII. Then it was the key E=Eb alto, B=Bb tenor, etc.
 

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1933 257k 10M example with decent engraving, though very likely not original lacquer:
It's clearly not original - there's lacquer over the cuttings.

And either the keys were nickel-plated, or it used to be an all-nickel horn - altho a nickel finish is durable enough that it's almost never lacquered over. Conn was alone among US makers in offering all-nickel-plated saxes.
 
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