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I am currently looking for a Selmer soprano, (please gang, don't spin, no other makers please)

The thread title says it all.

I have read most everything I can find. I still don't fully understand what are all the mechanical/layout diffs ? I read something about springs inside rods ???? Sounds a bit strange to me.

Sound is subjective, some say the Super 80 is a deeper sound, I like deeper in an in a bright horn like Sop.

Thanks all for response !!





My history:
Yrs ago I played VI's.. my first 2 Sops. Then over time some Vintage horns, Conn, Buescher, King, I tried Asian, Tai and Chinese, Kessler etc. Actually I bought a new II mid '80's but damn it was swiped about my 3rd gig in .. I do not remember much about,..GGrrrrrr...Then couple yrs later I bought a new series III silverplate. Over time I did not fall in love with it. No more III's
 

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Get a series II. They redesigned the tonehole placement on the series II and they are a lot more in tune. They sound about the same, but I had horrible intonation problems on my Series I even after having it worked on by Emilio Lyons.

Sopranos are like spouses. Once you find a good one, you stick with it for life. I “dated around” a lot but my YSS-875EX isn’t going anywhere ever because I don’t want to deal with relearning the whole horn. I tried them all: Selmer, Buffet, Keilwerth, Yani, other Yamahas, various vintage American horns (I still have a curved Buescher that also isn’t going anywhere); various Taiwanese horns including the Eastman 52nd St, Vikings, and Cannonbals; you name it, I’ve tried it.


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Sopranos are like spouses. Once you find a good one, you stick with it for life. I “dated around” a lot but my YSS-875EX isn’t going anywhere ever because I don’t want to deal with relearning the whole horn. I tried them all: Selmer, Buffet, Keilwerth, Yani, other Yamahas, various vintage American horns (I still have a curved Buescher that also isn’t going anywhere); various Taiwanese horns including the Eastman 52nd St, Vikings, and Cannonbals; you name it, I’ve tried it.
Could you explain more -- why the Yamaha 875 ? For you, what were the advantages over all the others ?
 

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Isn't a Serie II a Super 80?
 

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gary: That's how I understand it - just an "improved" (maybe "altered" is a better word) version of the original-issue Super Action 80. I think what Cash is asking is, what were the changes Selmer made to come up with the Serie II version of the SA80? DAVE
 

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gary: That's how I understand it - just an "improved" (maybe "altered" is a better word) version of the original-issue Super Action 80. I think what Cash is asking is, what were the changes Selmer made to come up with the Serie II version of the SA80? DAVE
Yes Dave..that's the question.
 

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Could you explain more -- why the Yamaha 875 ? For you, what were the advantages over all the others ?
Several things:

1. Initial tuning was much, much closer than any other horn I’ve tried. I can get any soprano in tune, eventually, as long as it is mechanically sound, but I didn’t have to work as hard with the Yamaha.

2. It was easier to shape my sound. I’m a classical guy, so I need to be able to do a few things that most jazz/pop guys don’t usually do, mostly multiphonics, and the Yamaha made that easier.

3. I like the way I sounded on it. Not like an oboe like on the YSS-62R, not too spread like a Selmer SA80.

4. I like the feel the best. Very free blowing, even with the curved neck. Yanis were much stuffier with the curved neck.

5. I like the flexibility of having two necks. A lot if people will go on and on about one-piece vs two piece. I like the two piece horns because you can change the necks for a different sound/tuning or if it gets damaged.


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Several things:

1. Initial tuning was much, much closer than any other horn I’ve tried. I can get any soprano in tune, eventually, as long as it is mechanically sound, but I didn’t have to work as hard with the Yamaha.

2. It was easier to shape my sound. I’m a classical guy, so I need to be able to do a few things that most jazz/pop guys don’t usually do, mostly multiphonics, and the Yamaha made that easier.

3. I like the way I sounded on it. Not like an oboe like on the YSS-62R, not too spread like a Selmer SA80.

4. I like the feel the best. Very free blowing, even with the curved neck. Yanis were much stuffier with the curved neck.

5. I like the flexibility of having two necks. A lot if people will go on and on about one-piece vs two piece. I like the two piece horns because you can change the necks for a different sound/tuning or if it gets damaged.


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Rude dude you're in the wrong thread,,Personally I think Yamamma s suck
 

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Rude dude you're in the wrong thread,,Personally I think Yamamma s suck
OK. Well, someone asked. Sorry if you took it as a hijack.

As an aside, I hate Selmer Super Action 80 sopranos. So there’s that.


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Hey folks I appreciate the sincere replies so far. I tried to head off the de-rails early but to no avail. Oh well there's Jerks in every crowd.
 

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OK. Well, someone asked. Sorry if you took it as a hijack.

As an aside, I hate Selmer Super Action 80 sopranos. So there’s that.


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Dude it was hijack have a nice day please go somewhere else
 

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Dude it was hijack have a nice day please go somewhere else
Sorry about that. Wasn’t intentional. Guy asked me why I liked my horn, I answered. But it did come off as a hijack now that I read it.

Anyway, read my other comments before the hijack. They actually did some retooling which I was trying to explain.


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gary: That's how I understand it - just an "improved" (maybe "altered" is a better word) version of the original-issue Super Action 80. I think what Cash is asking is, what were the changes Selmer made to come up with the Serie II version of the SA80? DAVE
Thanks, Dave. So the question is, what's the difference between the SA I and then SA II sopranos.
 

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Sorry about that. Wasn’t intentional. Guy asked me why I liked my horn, I answered. But it did come off as a hijack now that I read it.

Anyway, read my other comments before the hijack. They actually did some retooling which I was trying to explain.


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Thanks J. Max I appreciate your words, please elaborate on the tooling if you can.
 

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Thanks J. Max I appreciate your words, please elaborate on the tooling if you can.
The tonehole placement is different to improve intonation, there were a bunch of ergonomic improvements and the bore taper was slightly different. Really, the SA80 was the first real change for Selmer’s soprano line ever, which is crazy when you think about it. They hadn’t made substantial changes in keywork since the Model 26.

The SA80 (Series I) was the first attempt they made to modernize. Side palm keys. Modern floating LH cluster, etc. The problem was that they did all of that but they didn’t change the bore or taper quite as substantially. The Series II fixed that problem, which required some different tonehole placement AND they changed the ergonomics slightly so that the soprano, alto, and tenor models all felt the same.

I don’t know if they made changes in the mechanics (springs, etc) between the two. I can’t remember.


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I don't think generalizations work when parsing different models and brands. If Cash wants a Selmer SA80 or SAII, then that's all that is necessary to know - and to answer. But I don't see harm in mentioning other experiences/brands to illustrate points. After all, this whole site is read by many more than post or open a thread. We all get to participate and I'll bet other readers enjoyed reading all of the posts.

At any rate, like so many brands, manufacturers make continuing changes as production goes along. Whether or not those changes really mean something is another issue. I'm betting that one could find a certain SA-80 and compare it to a certain SAII and find no differences - or huge differences. It is ALL about the individual horn.

Having said that, I am curious about what Selmer did to make any differences between an SA-80 and an SAII. What were the changes?

J.Max already wrote about tone-hole placement. Yet, I recently played a silver SA-80 that was delightful. I also played several different brands that day, side-by-side and they all sounded like good-playing sopranos. Maybe the differences between the SA-80 and the SAII aren't all that much, across the production spectrum. DAVE

edit: Looks like J.Max and I were writing at the same time.
 

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I should mention...the tonehole placement is a subtle change. It’s not like when Yamaha changed the 62. A few have been moved slightly up or down to accommodate the new bore. The intonation is very good on the Series II.


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Well I have to be honest, this info is all so general it don't mean much to me. Dave you have a theory that sounds reasonable to me.


Now, back to the question..do the changes over time mean something, when did they happen ?? what were they..??


ah well, the mysteries of life...:whistle:
 

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The tonehole placement is different to improve intonation, there were a bunch of ergonomic improvements and the bore taper was slightly different. Really, the SA80 was the first real change for Selmer’s soprano line ever, which is crazy when you think about it. They hadn’t made substantial changes in keywork since the Model 26.

The SA80 (Series I) was the first attempt they made to modernize. Side palm keys. Modern floating LH cluster, etc. The problem was that they did all of that but they didn’t change the bore or taper quite as substantially. The Series II fixed that problem, which required some different tonehole placement AND they changed the ergonomics slightly so that the soprano, alto, and tenor models all felt the same.

I don’t know if they made changes in the mechanics (springs, etc) between the two. I can’t remember.


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This is good info, thanks, it makes sense..I'm going for a SA II
 
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