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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know this has happened to a lot of people in the past, but on my bari the little screw that keeps the neck in place does not tighten enough so the neck is always sliding around. How does this happen and what can be done to fix it?
 

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Distinguished SOTW Tech/Forum Contributor 2007
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the neck needs to be fit to the tenon, the neck is too loose... any tech should be able to fix this very quickly...
 

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There's only so much that poor little screw can do.
You need to have the neck expanded. Like mike said, your tech can do this for you rather quickly. :)
 

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It's interesting how we are led to believe that minute dimensions are critical in the bore of a sax, yet we are quite happy to expand those tenons and increase the bore diameter in the process.

Just stirring! :)
 

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You two are naughty!
Re: the OP's question, my understanding was the act of allowing the neck to move while the screw was tightened (partially, I assume) acted the same as a tech's shrinking die, gradually making the neck tenon smaller. Expanding the tenon *should* return it to its original diameter (which should also address Gordon's problem with "messing with" the bore diameter :) ).
 

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That all depends on which part is changing diameter. Is the socket stretching or the tenon?

Or, if the neck was ever correct in the first place, did the user abuse the receiver by improperly handling the horn?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for the help guys. This is a school owned Series II with the 2 screw deal. It was like this when i got it, so i dont know about any previous damage. How much would it cost to fix this?
 

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This is a school owned Series II with the 2 screw deal. It was like this when i got it, so i dont know about any previous damage. How much would it cost to fix this?
It shouldn't cost you anything - it's down to your school to pay for repair work on their instruments.
 

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the can opener expander acts as burnisher and should provide minimal distortion on the internal diameter of the neck. also my answer assumed the reader knowss, you would only use the expander to take up a very small distance... and also to the question, i assumed you are repairing the original neck which is now loose.
 

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It's interesting how we are led to believe that minute dimensions are critical in the bore of a sax, yet we are quite happy to expand those tenons and increase the bore diameter in the process.

Just stirring! :)
So, the correct repair is ... Buy a lathe and measuring tools, as well as a hunk of brass of the approprate metalurgy, preferably from recycled shell casings that were melted then hand hammered into the appropriate sized "billet" before machining. Then machine a new tenon to the appropriate surface finish whilst carefully keeping the metal cool as to not anneal it... Stiring a little more.

To answer the original question. What causes it? IMO the reciever is probably expanded as much as the tenon has shrank. This is probably caused by the torque on the reciever and tenon form Normal and abnormal use and or abuse over the years. The appropriate fix if it can be expanded and fit correctly it to expand the tenon. If it is beyond expanding then machining and or buying a new tenon and/or reciever is the "fix".
 

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And with it being a school instrument, general maintenance is usually overlooked and crook tenons and sockets don't get cleaned very often so they get a build-up of crud on them that in turn acts as an abrasive which in turn wears the once tight fitting parts down so they become loose.

And this isn't just the case with school instruments as I've seen this on a lot of saxes where the owner doesn't keep the tenon and socket clean - and don't forget to keep the end stopper clean as well (and remembering what it's there for!). A simple wipe over with a cloth after playing is all that's needed and that will ensure a good fit for decades.
 

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You two are naughty!
Re: the OP's question, my understanding was the act of allowing the neck to move while the screw was tightened (partially, I assume) acted the same as a tech's shrinking die, gradually making the neck tenon smaller. Expanding the tenon *should* return it to its original diameter (which should also address Gordon's problem with "messing with" the bore diameter :) ).
Sure, with the reinforcing ring around it, it is unlikely that the clamping part of the socket would expand. My thinking was more to do with the lower part of the socket. Sure, it has a little reinforcing from the junction with the body, but to counter that, it is much more difficult to shrink a tube that to expand it. (And isn't the socket often thinner metal than the tenon?) So I rather think that when the bottom part of the socket is lose, causing leaks, it is a either congenital defect or caused by distortion (expansion) of the socket during ab-use.
 

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the can opener expander acts as burnisher and should provide minimal distortion on the internal diameter of the neck. also my answer assumed the reader knowss, you would only use the expander to take up a very small distance... and also to the question, i assumed you are repairing the original neck which is now loose.
A can opener type reduces the thickness of the metal. But metal cannot be shrunk in volume, so the can opener reduces the thickness by making the circumference larger. If the circumference is larger, then both the ID and OD are larger, the ID slightly more affected than the OD.

But you're right, its "minimal".

But some guys argue in this forum that minuscule alterations to the bore alter the way a sax sounds.
 

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But some guys argue in this forum that minuscule alterations to the bore alter the way a sax sounds.
The arguement is that it will make the tenon fit better in the socket and the instrument will therefore respond much better than if the tenon was left loose and leaking.

One problem is now some crook tenons have threaded bores that allegedly act as 'tone boosters', so expanding these types of 'trendy tenons' using the can opener will most likely damage the threaded section.
 
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