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I found a reso chamber that has been refaced to 105 tip opening. I have not been able to stop thinking about it. I didn't have the money for it and am currently trying to raise it. I tested a whole bunch of vintage pieces on my Ref 36. Two that stuck out were a Meyer Bros Tenor 80 tip size and Reso Chamber 105. They both were magical and made my tone buttery and vibrant in a way I've never felt before. I used a Rico Jazz Select 3S on both. The Meyer was super buttery and effortless to play. It just made you happy it sounded so cool. The Reso was also buttery but not quite as easy to play (Though definitely not hard to play). The Reso was different than anything I've ever played. So rich and lush I was overcome with satisfaction several times when playing it. (I read someone wrote they sound hoarse, like a Slant Sig with a sore throat- and I would agree with that (In a good way though!) That is an extremely rare event for me. The thing is I've shared the recording I made of it while trying it with other people and no one really loves it. In fact a couple of non musicians preferred the sound of my stock otto link new vintage 5* hard rubber piece- because it has a more clear sound so to speak. I can say though, that while a very nice piece, my new vintage link (which I got from another forum member here for $100, has never given me the chills like the Reso Chamber.

There are other mouthpeices that would be better for bebop tenor saxophone (Bird is my main and first inspiration) For example the hard rubber "JazzMaster".Has anyone tried these? Wheew talk a speed demon's dream! But on tenor I feel the essence of what I want to get it is in this video.
Not the sound per say, but he essence of what Stan is communicating. I think the Reso I tried gives me the best shot at it. I think I'll keep the playing fast thing to the alto.

So my next thing to deal with is trying to cobble together the money for it. It was refaced to a 105 by one of the very best. Is $1,200 too much for a mouthpiece?
Yep.
 

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To me, Resos are less of a Tone Master Link but more of a Dukof Short Shank- Stubby. They have a higher floor than the Tone Master and more projection, very comparable to Dukoff Stubby while having a very large chamber. For a lot of people that is a winning combination of how a tenor saxophone should sound.
 

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$1200 IMO is too much for any mouthpiece- at least it would be for me. I can see it if you are a professional artist-level player in terms of wanting a very particular set of characteristics in a mouthpiece or if you're so wealthy that the price is virtually of no concern. Otherwise there's almost always another option that will get 90+% of the way there at 1/2 the price or less.
 

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Appreciate the feedback. Sigmund I have purchased an expensive mouthpiece before and definitely fell victim to the placebo effect as you mention. I told myself "Oh I will get used to it". Well I never did and sold it months later for a small loss. This time however I really did get chills from the mouthpiece. It's such an odd position because I know that feeling it gave me was the reason I pick up the sax. Can you give me an idea of what a Reso Chamber in perfect condition refaced by one of the best is worth?
 

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$1200 IMO is too much for any mouthpiece- at least it would be for me. I can see it if you are a professional artist-level player in terms of wanting a very particular set of characteristics in a mouthpiece or if you're so wealthy that the price is virtually of no concern. Otherwise there's almost always another option that will get 90+% of the way there at 1/2 the price or less.
Thanks for the input KeithL. It's actually what my teacher/mentor told me. He said I should not spend more than $400. It's just an odd position to be in because I can't stop thinking about how the Reso sounded and more importantly, how it made me feel. I never experienced that before. I got some of the same "chill's" type of feeling from the Meyer Bros tenor piece that was refaced by the same guy just not as big of a sound. So I'm thinking maybe the refacing work had something to do with it. I may go with the Meyer because it is $500. The sound is not as fat but still buttery and light chills.

Regarding the price, to be fair to the refacer, he is one of the best in the word and has a long list of famous clientele who he caters to and sells to at these prices and higher. Plus I like him and believe in his work. Now weather I'm good enough to make the piece play its best is another story. I just know the sound it made me really happy.
 

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To me, Resos are less of a Tone Master Link but more of a Dukof Short Shank- Stubby. They have a higher floor than the Tone Master and more projection, very comparable to Dukoff Stubby while having a very large chamber. For a lot of people that is a winning combination of how a tenor saxophone should sound.
Sakshama did the dukof short shank stuffy come in hard rubber? I would be interested in trying one.
 

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I found a reso chamber that has been refaced to 105 tip opening. I have not been able to stop thinking about it. I didn't have the money for it and am currently trying to raise it. I tested a whole bunch of vintage pieces on my Ref 36. Two that stuck out were a Meyer Bros Tenor 80 tip size and Reso Chamber 105. They both were magical and made my tone buttery and vibrant in a way I've never felt before. I used a Rico Jazz Select 3S on both. The Meyer was super buttery and effortless to play. It just made you happy it sounded so cool. The Reso was also buttery but not quite as easy to play (Though definitely not hard to play). The Reso was different than anything I've ever played. So rich and lush I was overcome with satisfaction several times when playing it. (I read someone wrote they sound hoarse, like a Slant Sig with a sore throat- and I would agree with that (In a good way though!) That is an extremely rare event for me. The thing is I've shared the recording I made of it while trying it with other people and no one really loves it. In fact a couple of non musicians preferred the sound of my stock otto link new vintage 5* hard rubber piece- because it has a more clear sound so to speak. I can say though, that while a very nice piece, my new vintage link (which I got from another forum member here for $100, has never given me the chills like the Reso Chamber.

There are other mouthpeices that would be better for bebop tenor saxophone (Bird is my main and first inspiration) For example the hard rubber "JazzMaster".Has anyone tried these? Wheew talk a speed demon's dream! But on tenor I feel the essence of what I want to get it is in this video.
Not the sound per say, but he essence of what Stan is communicating. I think the Reso I tried gives me the best shot at it. I think I'll keep the playing fast thing to the alto.

So my next thing to deal with is trying to cobble together the money for it. It was refaced to a 105 by one of the very best. Is $1,200 too much for a mouthpiece?
Yes, $1200 is too much for a refaced mouthpiece.

If you are referring to the Doc Tenny "Jazzmaster", yes, I had a couple - one directly from Doc. Ben Allen's "10E" model was very close to it, but Ben isn't making mouthpieces any more either, so that's just a head's up to watch for one in case one pops up.

I agree with your observations about the sound of the Reso. Ever since I got the Intrepid, that's all I have been using - sold my Links and Lambersons.

G'luck on your quest. It's great to see that you are keeping the tenor in your life. I hope you find your dream setup for the alto as well.
 

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Ben Wendel as well. I think that these are like the ToneMaster of the rubber world. People saw the cover of Blue Train and want to sound just like that. Then they buy an original piece or even get one worked on and it's not bright like that.

I wrote an article about Reso Chambers a few years ago because so many think they can sound like that just by blowing into the mouthpiece. Some setups just go from the start, but if you aren't voicing the same way someone like Seamus or Ben Wendel are, they will feel deader than they'd hoped. Keeping these small or playing original with the hardest reed that still feels responsive and playing along with these guys helps I find.

What people like about these is the chunkiness to the sound I find. If you can learn to brighten them up, there is no comparison. Slant Tone Edges for instance will feel tighter, brighter and thinner if you get into the Reso thing. Most people will gravitate to a Slant type piece for this sound because it starts brighter. This is a generalization of course but I have played dozens of these and worked on quite a few. I really like them around modern 5*-6*. You can really push a piece like this and it never gets too bright.
Then you have this problem today of people taking these vintage pieces or new pieces designed after those older ones, and playing them with an 8-9 tip opening, clueless that these were played at a 4-6 tip size by the cats back in the day. You will destroy the original vibe of these pieces by doing this.
 

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Sakshama did the dukoff short shank stubby come in hard rubber? I would be interested in trying one.
No, they didn't make Stubby-like pieces in hard rubber. They had Fluted Chamber hard rubber pieces, very similar to Slant signature. They also came without the grooves- flutes too. Still thinking about it, the differences are not that big, just the chamber size while the rest of the concept is pretty much there although, trying to make the same mouthpiece in rubber and metal never comes out the same. Florida STM and Slant signature are good examples. Probably I should try to make a resin mouthpiece in a similar style.
 

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Otto Wanne has the following description: "They have a dark mellow sound."

That can be said about quite a few makes and models. Some seem to swear by these. I am curious - not skeptical - what makes them so special?

Thanks.
Regarding the mouthpieces:

I've owned quite a few "Reso Chamber" Links over the years, and the chamber is quite big inside. Bigger than any Tone Edge, but not quite as large as the Eburnated Bar "Slant Sig" pieces that preceded the Reso Chamber. From the factory, they have little to no baffle and work well in small tips, but pretty tubby playing.

I played one that was refaced and restamped 7 by the factory, and it was pretty good, but the best ones were refaced by established modern refacers (Jon Van Wie, Ted Klum, Sebastian Knox, Brian Powell, et al). They were able to get more baffle, and make the mouthpiece speak with more of the full sounding, edgy sound that people today want. So in short, they're antiquated mouthpieces that work best when heavily modified by skilled craftspeople.

Regarding gear in general:

The best mouthpiece is the one you're used to, with the reed that seems to play on whatever mouthpiece you use (y'know, the "broken in" one). Many people these days (myself included until a few years ago) put too much of an emphasis on "X" player and what they're using. Most of what you hear as a persons "sound" is actually their time feel, articulation, phrasing, and sense of pitch. These are things that equipment won't help. The only answer is spending the time to lift, and learn to mimic the sounds we hear our favourite players have.

Here's a clip show some of my students to illustrate that gear doesn't really influence much...

 
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