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Distinguished SOTW Member/Forum Contributor 2008
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This is brilliant

haduran said:
On the foam; take the horns, wrap them in saran wrap. Get some spray insulating foam from your local hardware store. Fill the case to half its depth or so with the foam. Place a rectangle of felt of sufficient size over the foam after about ten minutes so that it overlaps the case sides by several inches on all four sides. Carefully place the horns on the felt over the foam so that it comes up around them but not over them. If using expanding foam check periodically for the first hour and a half or so to make sure that its not overflowing. The foam won't go through the felt but it may swell unexpectedly out of the sides- you can carefully pick off unwanted blobs with a paper towel (the stuff is REALLY gooey and sticky beyond belief so do not get it anywhere you don't want it- keep a plastic bag lined trash can at hand). After two hours or so you'll want to arrange the felt around the horns and case- the foam is still very much mushable under the felt- leave the horns in place while you do this. Once all seems about right carefully close the case- making sure that you don't squish foam out anywhere and with an edge of felt sticking out ou all four sides. Case closed and all in place? You have to close the case because the foam will continue to slowly expand and if you don't let it set up with the case closed you may wind up unable to close it at all. You want a perfect "no play" snug fit. Leave it alone a full twenty four hours and then carefully remove the horns, trim the felt and glue the edges down inside the case and voila; a perfectly formfitting case with stress on the horn distributed across the instrument instead of concentrated on thumbrests, guards, ETC. I've done this for several horns and have shipped them with me through really abusive circumstances around the world with never the smallest hint of damage- even when the case had clearly been very badly handled.
What a great Idea.
This should be C&P'd to the Frugal Sax forum
 

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Grumps said:
Yeah, nothing like clanging two horns together in a gig bag...
No Kidding, That was the first thought I had when I saw them advertised for the first time. I've never seen one on person but as I recall a piece of foam divided the horns... DE-LUXE!!! Plus they have wheelies and pull handles and all sorts of "handy" features.

That's right kids, now you can destroy both your horns in one handy bag!
 

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haduran said:
On the foam; take the horns, wrap them in saran wrap. Get some spray insulating foam from your local hardware store. Fill the case to half its depth or so with the foam. Place a rectangle of felt of sufficient size over the foam after about ten minutes so that it overlaps the case sides by several inches on all four sides. Carefully place the horns on the felt over the foam so that it comes up around them but not over them. If using expanding foam check periodically for the first hour and a half or so to make sure that its not overflowing. The foam won't go through the felt but it may swell unexpectedly out of the sides- you can carefully pick off unwanted blobs with a paper towel (the stuff is REALLY gooey and sticky beyond belief so do not get it anywhere you don't want it- keep a plastic bag lined trash can at hand). After two hours or so you'll want to arrange the felt around the horns and case- the foam is still very much mushable under the felt- leave the horns in place while you do this. Once all seems about right carefully close the case- making sure that you don't squish foam out anywhere and with an edge of felt sticking out ou all four sides. Case closed and all in place? You have to close the case because the foam will continue to slowly expand and if you don't let it set up with the case closed you may wind up unable to close it at all. You want a perfect "no play" snug fit. Leave it alone a full twenty four hours and then carefully remove the horns, trim the felt and glue the edges down inside the case and voila; a perfectly formfitting case with stress on the horn distributed across the instrument instead of concentrated on thumbrests, guards, ETC. I've done this for several horns and have shipped them with me through really abusive circumstances around the world with never the smallest hint of damage- even when the case had clearly been very badly handled.

Very interesting !!!

Does this material hold it's shape long term?
In other words, if you used it to make a case for regular use would it last or crumble to powder?
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
why on earth would you want to sell an yani 800 alto? are you nuts?
I guess it comes down to preference's. I just prefer my YAS-23 to it. I don't know how to explain it.
I think those were the "Allora" wheelie bags from WWBW
I thought about those, but then I thought about repairs, and decided they weren't worth it. Kinda courious though who uses them for the Alto/Tenor combo.
Does this material hold it's shape long term?
In other words, if you used it to make a case for regular use would it last or crumble to powder?
Yeah, how does the case hold up long term?
 
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