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Distinguished SOTW Member
selmer 26 nino, 22 curved sop, super alto, King Super 20 and Martin tenors, Stowasser tartogatos
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My experience has been that even 20 cents or so is livable, *if* all the neighboring notes are also similarly mistuned. It is when all of a sudden one note in a range is much sharper or flatter than its neighbors that is really murderous, as it leaves no time to adjust the embouchure in normal playing.

Toby
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member
selmer 26 nino, 22 curved sop, super alto, King Super 20 and Martin tenors, Stowasser tartogatos
Joined
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3,412 Posts
playitfunky said:
snip

For instance you know you are in tune. You are playing great. Now comes a unison part with a player that is always a little sharp. Instead of sounding bad you instantly match his pitch creating a sound that is better then it would have been if you played in tune and the other player was sharp. The closer the sound waves are to each other the worst it is when playing in unison with another player. Being able to play in tune with other players is to me what encompasses good intonation. It's not just being in tune when you play against a tuner.
Ack! This reminds me of when I was young, playing first oboe with a second oboist who was consistently 20-30 cents sharp. It was always "Sophie's choice": either I could be in tune with him and out of tune with the rest of the orchestra, or vice-versa. A no-winner...

Toby
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member
selmer 26 nino, 22 curved sop, super alto, King Super 20 and Martin tenors, Stowasser tartogatos
Joined
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3,412 Posts
Short-tube notes are much more bendable (sensitive to embouchure) than long-tube notes, so often when you have players who "bite up" on the reed you will find them getting progressively sharper as they remove fingers.

Toby
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member
selmer 26 nino, 22 curved sop, super alto, King Super 20 and Martin tenors, Stowasser tartogatos
Joined
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3,412 Posts
You of course know the definition of a minor 2nd: two oboes playing in unison...

Toby
 
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