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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

Can anyone suggest a preamp/mixer/? that I would use to record with my Rode NT-2A mic into my Macbook Pro? When I purchased the mic I did not realize that my Yamaha mixer did not have phantom power on any channels. So, now I need a good way to get from the mic to the laptop and into Garage Band or Logic. I would prefer firewire interface... Any suggestions?

Thank you for your help!

Sarah
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Quality is more important than budget, I would say. The goal is to record jazz solos with instrumental tracks.

No more than 4 inputs.
 

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Hello,

Can anyone suggest a preamp/mixer/? that I would use to record with my Rode NT-2A mic into my Macbook Pro? When I purchased the mic I did not realize that my Yamaha mixer did not have phantom power on any channels. So, now I need a good way to get from the mic to the laptop and into Garage Band or Logic. I would prefer firewire interface... Any suggestions?

Thank you for your help!

Sarah
It depends on what operating system your mac runs on - there's stuff out there compatible with Mac but if you are using Mountain lion check compatability before buying.
 

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Try focusrite.com
I have the basic usb scarlett and it does an excellent job.
 

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One thing to consider is the possibility that whatever you buy may be virtually disposable, useful for the life of your current computer.
You could sell it to a user of vintage (five years old) computers, or maintain a vintage system of your own, but state of the art today is often not long lived.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Got it. Went ahead and picked up the Saffire Pro, it was on sale at Guitar Center anyway for $224. I will report back on how it goes. Thank you!
 

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One thing to consider is the possibility that whatever you buy may be virtually disposable, useful for the life of your current computer.
You could sell it to a user of vintage (five years old) computers, or maintain a vintage system of your own, but state of the art today is often not long lived.
Many interfaces can be used standalone (I believe the Saffire Pro is such an interface). So when it's stop being supported by the manufacturer, and you upgrade to a computer it no longer works with (which can be a LONG time from now depending on the factors), you can connect it to a newer interface and still make use of it's preamps.
 

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I had considered the continued usability as a preamp, but am somewhat disinclined to buy expensive new gear that will be essentially half broken in a few years. When that time comes, a new interface pre will be needed, and the old unit will be duct tape, not very useful for digital recording if you have to get another converter to use it. Less than a year ago I read a bunch of recording forums (watch out for those forums) to pick an interface pre, and decided on whatever version of the saffire pro was out. After talking with a recording tech (a tech head that remembers what came out when and what's coming out next) at a music store about using it with my less than a year old macbook, the conclusion we came to was that my options would give a shorter usage than I wanted to pay for.
How long a usage you get will depend on your particular computer and the particular unit. Probably best if they are both new, the latest version, and purchased at the same time.
This is just something to consider when deciding between laying down $200 or $1000, that it may not be a long term investment like high end analog gear used to be.
There are people who still keep an old Mac G4 tower running OS9 for scanning film.
And recording professionals that replace their digital gear every couple of years.
I think B&H photo was beating the GC price on the Saffires.
 

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Hello,

Can anyone suggest a preamp/mixer/? that I would use to record with my Rode NT-2A mic into my Macbook Pro? When I purchased the mic I did not realize that my Yamaha mixer did not have phantom power on any channels. So, now I need a good way to get from the mic to the laptop and into Garage Band or Logic. I would prefer firewire interface... Any suggestions?

Thank you for your help!

Sarah
Actually, if your mixer has the ADA interface and all you need is phantom power, you can get a stand alone power supply for $50 or less.
I apologize if I'm way off base, but it's easier to buy than to get good results, sometimes overspending in one area is lost to other shortfalls.
 

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Aside from the performance itself, by far the most important part of a good recording is the room it is recorded in. As in, 95% of the battle.

I would rather go into battle with one or two SM57s, an Mbox, and a laptop in an amazing sounding room, than have $50,000 worth of gear and nowhere good sounding to record.

In my opinion, aside from the performance, a good recording is 95% the room, 4% microphone placement, and 1% for everything else combined.
 

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Aside from the performance itself, by far the most important part of a good recording is the room it is recorded in. As in, 95% of the battle.

I would rather go into battle with one or two SM57s, an Mbox, and a laptop in an amazing sounding room, than have $50,000 worth of gear and nowhere good sounding to record.

In my opinion, aside from the performance, a good recording is 95% the room, 4% microphone placement, and 1% for everything else combined.
Man, other then the performance being the most important thing, I just couldn't disagree more with everything else you said. We are talking about sax here. Right? If were talking drums, or upright bass, or something really room dependent, then the room is really important. But 95%? You get a great mic in close on the sax, and the room becomes not as important. I've recorded in everything from hotel rooms to tour buses to garages surrounded by boxes and a lawn mower. And if you like distortion, a 57 and mbox is great.

This is one of my favorite sounding recordings of all time.
The drums were recorded in a bedroom in a cabin in Franklin Tn. For real! No matter how hard you try, you ain't gettin that with a mBox and a SM57. Even if your tracking in Capitol Studio A.
 

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Man, other then the performance being the most important thing, I just couldn't disagree more with everything else you said. We are talking about sax here. Right? If were talking drums, or upright bass, or something really room dependent, then the room is really important. But 95%? You get a great mic in close on the sax, and the room becomes not as important. I've recorded in everything from hotel rooms to tour buses to garages surrounded by boxes and a lawn mower. And if you like distortion, a 57 and mbox is great.

This is one of my favorite sounding recordings of all time.
The drums were recorded in a bedroom in a cabin in Franklin Tn. For real! No matter how hard you try, you ain't gettin that with a mBox and a SM57. Even if your tracking in Capitol Studio A.
I would say the room IS very important, however most people don't realize that some rooms actually sound great as is. You don't necessarily need a "treated" room to sound good. My bedroom sounds fantastic. My practice room also sounds fantastic. Neither have much done to them, but they still sound pretty good, even with mic not stuffed down the bell. Some rooms just sound bad, and in such cases you shouldn't record there.,
 

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I would say the room IS very important, however most people don't realize that some rooms actually sound great as is. You don't necessarily need a "treated" room to sound good. My bedroom sounds fantastic. My practice room also sounds fantastic. Neither have much done to them, but they still sound pretty good, even with mic not stuffed down the bell. Some rooms just sound bad, and in such cases you shouldn't record there.,
I agree it is a part of the equation. But 95%? Even 50%. No way. Great gear and smart placement can usually compensate for room shortcomings. But distortion from a cheap chain, or lack of detail is what it is. You can't add detail in the mix. It's either there or not.

The problem I hear with most SOTW recordings is that guys sound waaaaay too far away from the mic. They record much too much of the room in there. Which is a huge problem with using a zoom or the likes. They are stereo mics that pick up all around you. And if you placed it close enough to loose the room, it would be nothing but distortion. A nice cardioid, that can handle the volume, pointed at the bell in the sweet spot is the way for a solo instrument recording. You want intimacy with the horn sound. Not room
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Just a final follow up to this thread. I ended up purchasing a Focusrite Saffire Pro 14 firewire interface. My music room is about 10'x10' in my home. Between the cartoid function of the Rode NT2A and the Saffire, I couldn't be happier. I am using it with Garage Band for now until I am able to purchase and learn Logic.
 
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