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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2017
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I realize there are many different types of shows so answers may vary. Bar gigs, concerts, festivals, and corporate events are the ones I do. The question is: Do you head for the door between sets or after the show? Do you sit and rest? Hang out in the green room after? Or do you mingle with your audience? Pick up girls (or guys) What?

Me - I try to spend time talking to the audience and networking, but sometimes I'm just too bushed and end up sitting there like a zombie.

On corporate gigs I mostly hit the door because it's usually not about the band.

9 of 10 concerts, I'm with the opener so I grab a quick drink (or 2) and maybe a shower and change in the green room - than I go out and enjoy the headliner.

Festivals - I do my best to enjoy the festivities.

Bar gigs I network and glad-hand my butt off. I may slip out back for a sec, but I do everything in my power to sign people up to the mailing lists, promote merchandise sales and generally tell people what a great audience they are....

Edit: Somehow I frequently end up eating breakfast with a large group of people at 4:00 AM. Don't know why really....
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2012
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Pack up my horn, asap ... all else is less important.
 

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Forum Contributor 2010-2016
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At the end of a set my first impulse is to catch up with the other players in the band. I play in a few different settings and there's usually someone I haven't seen in quite a while.

This has made me examine my conscience a bit and one thing I feel a bit ashamed about is that while I look for people I like to talk to, I also spend a fair bit of effort avoiding the ones I don't want to talk to.
 

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my gigs are always pretty late, so I can't ever linger. I have to respect my mom's wishes and get the hell out so she can go home and sleep. it sucks, but it's a fair trade for doing the gig to begin with. it sucks being 15 :p
 

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Get the check, say thank you and head home to the girls. Worked out pretty well tonight.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2011
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get a glass of red wine, mingle with the audience, pee
 

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I mostly do bar gigs. Usually set break goes like this: make my way to the bar, flirt with the bartender, get a drink, hide it in the green room, avoid drunken audience members, sneak out back, smoke a cigarette with the band/restaurant staff. I need to stop smoking but it seems so natural to do that on a set break. a reason to go outside, other than avoiding the drunken audience. if it's a soft seater show or festival or something I just take the opportunity to sit backstage and kick off my heels, and check my hair about 8 times. I've tried bringing books or knitting etc, but I'm just never in the headspace to concentrate on stuff like that during breaks. and I am no good at networking.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member/Bass Sax Boss
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I almost always thank the band leader. Even if I didn't like the gig, he could have called someone else. I'm the one going home with the bread, and I have the leader/contractor to thank for that.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2017
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I almost always thank the band leader. Even if I didn't like the gig, he could have called someone else. I'm the one going home with the bread, and I have the leader/contractor to thank for that.
Both this and protecting your instruments are on my list too. I sort of view it as part of the job however to interact with the audience. They always have both questions and nice things to say (even on bad nights) and it's a great way to turn a customer who enjoys the music into a dedicated fan. A band without a following has a hard time making it to whatever the next level might be.

And if you have a fan base, ignoring them is a good way to lose a portion of it. He's not a musician, but my wife and I ran into the acclaimed chef "Emeril" at a restaurant last year while on vacation. Our family and his shared a private dining area (It just worked out that way) She, in her typical fashion, introduced herself and paid the man high compliments. He, on the other hand - acted like a big jerk. His wife I believe, even apologized for his behavior when we ran into her later. Just as I share this story with you, my wife shares it with her friends as well, along with the caveat that she will NEVER watch his show or buy his products again.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2012
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Forum Contributor 2017
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Why bother, you won't get it 'til everyone's gone.
It's last on the owner's list of priorities.
Why bother? Nice......[rolleyes]

I remember those days in bars too but now that I only play in high end restaurant situations I have found that the entertainment is taken care of quickly.

My experience anyway.

B
 

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SOTW Columnist, Distinguished SOTW Member
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Both this and protecting your instruments are on my list too. I sort of view it as part of the job however to interact with the audience. They always have both questions and nice things to say (even on bad nights) and it's a great way to turn a customer who enjoys the music into a dedicated fan. A band without a following has a hard time making it to whatever the next level might be. .
In spite of my flip answer ('head for the bar'), I totally agree with this. On most of our gigs there are some friends, other musicians, and, most important of all, new potential fans present in the audience. I try to chat them all up, hand out a business card, etc. Luckily all of this can be accomplished while ordering a beer (and often ends up getting that beer paid for :) ). I'm lucky because my band mates are really good at interacting with the audience, both on and off stage.

Hey Fader, I assumed your question was what to do during a break. At the end of a gig, yeah, the very first thing I do is pack up my horn. I don't feel comfortable until it's safely packed away in its case.
 

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I mostly play bar gigs these days, and my routine for the break is similar to those above. Put my horn in the case - I quit using stands because stage space is usually at a premium and people aren't always aware of what's around them. Then I head for the bar for a beer, and always tip the bar tender even if they comp me. A lot better to pay a buck for a drink than wind up paying full price, or taking it out of the band's earnings. If there are regulars in the crowd I go say hi and make small talk.

After the gig I pack up, help tear down the PA if we're using our own rig, then count the tip jar while the leader gets paid. If it's one of those places that takes forever to pay the band then I just take off and pick up my pay the next time I see him.
 
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