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By the end of a couple of practice sessions the outside of my horn is covered in spit. I use a swab on the inside, but what do you use on the outside? Especially if you don't catch it before it dries.
 

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Grafton + TH & C alto || Naked Lady 10M || TT soprano || Martin Comm III
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Very slightly damp cloth. No product at all if it's laquer and just a bit of spit.

If it's also a bit greasy or dirty I might use some light window cleaner, but sprayed onto the cloth first, not onto the horn because I'm not that precise and would probably spray bits that might be better left unsprayed.
 

· Forum Contributor 2017
“I play sax but mostly it plays me”
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I've yet to try Pledge which sounds promising. I am currently using a Yamaha lacquer polishing cloth and a water.
 

· Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2015-
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Meguiars products - that’s what a lot of guitar builders use for final polish on lacquer finishes. I use the Cleaner/Polish, and there is also a detailed spray version. It will leave a protective coat that makes subsequent cleaning easier.

For a first pass, just use a damp cloth to get off the heavy stuff.

Whatever product(s) you use, don’t spray it into the mechanism (pivots, etc.).
 
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By the end of a couple of practice sessions the outside of my horn is covered in spit. I use a swab on the inside, but what do you use on the outside? Especially if you don't catch it before it dries.
Hi, make it routine to wipe down the exterior of the horn with a good non treated polishing cloth, microfiber cloths are great because they can wick the spittle off and they clean easily as well. For spittle that accumulated near, on, and around particular tone holes, the ever ubiquitous q-tip swab is indispensable and cost effective as well. An occasional inspection of dried spittle can be easily cleaned with a little bit of rubbing alcohol on the end of a q-tip and then you can gently swab it off with the dry end.
 

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Since I used to do "play conditions" on scores of "rental returns" I came up with a technique that worked well for me. Using soft cotton "assembly gloves" on both hands, I spray a light mist of Pledge on one hand, wipe the instrument with that glove, and then "buff" with the dry glove. For the hard to get to "nooks and crannies" I spray a light mist on one end of a Q-tip (cotton bud) and use that in the same fashion.
 

· Forum Contributor 2012, SOTW Saxophone Whisperer,
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The other thing that should be noted is pledge with wax vs pledge without. When I was taught to use pledge, the only kind had wax. If you can find the pledge with wax, thats the better stuff to use. It offers a tad of protection to the finish - for instance, spit would bead up and run off for a while.
 
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