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After rehearsal tonight (community band thing) a drummer was asking me if I was interested in getting a combo together (maybe not exactly what he said - but that's how I chose to hear it).

Looks like we've got a drummer - that's a real good start.

What else do I need for players & how should I approach charts?

I think we'll also need a bass player - a keyboard would be nice, perhaps a brass player or two (let's not go crazy).

Would an electric bass work? Or should we be looking for a string bass player (if we can find one).

Are trad combos run like Dixiland as far as charts and playing them goes?

When I was a jazz camp we had the "fake" charts - basically the chords and the head - and that's all we needed. Everyone plays through the chorus - players run a few solos -then chorus out. Is traditional jazz done the same way? (I'm not sure if there are really differences here - the more I type the sillier my questions sound. -lol).

Any recommendations on good tunes to start with? I have a few players in mind - but we may have one or two persons on board that may be new to improvising - so easy chord changes are a good thing.

Thanks everyone (as always)!
John
 

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Look for guys who'll show up to rehearsal and are eager to progress and don't judge you harshly for your short comings. Helpful people, etc..
 

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Just My Opinion

Some easy II VI I tunes and blues tunes will get you on your way. Blue Trane, Blue Monk, Blue Nun, All The Things You Are, Out of Nowhere.
 

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"Traditional Jazz Combo"

Your use of the phrase "traditional jazz combo" is confusing, because "traditional jazz" is synonomous with Dixieland. Most likely you mean simply "jazz combo" or "modern jazz combo."

The most common group instrumentation is probably trumpet + sax + possibly trombone + keyboard and/or guitar + bass (acoustic or electric) + drums.

You can do it with charts, with "sketches," with lead sheets, or with no music at all depending on the skill level of the individuals.
 

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Interesting. For some reason I associated Dixiland with a tuba or bass sax baseline - whereas from what I've seen a trad jazz (or perhaps modern jazz) uses a string bass.

Is this not the case?
 

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hgrail said:
Interesting. For some reason I associated Dixiland with a tuba or bass sax baseline - whereas from what I've seen a trad jazz (or perhaps modern jazz) uses a string bass.

Is this not the case?
Sometimes they would use Tuba and very rarely Bass Sax, but for the most part they'd use Double Bass. Trad Jazz is generally used as a term used to refer to the older(pre-WW II swing and early jazz) whereas Dixieland is a term generally connected with the revival of that music by far less interesting(and mostly white) players in the 50s-70s. The word comes from the name of the Original Dixieland Jazz Band, who were the first band to record jazz and who happened to be white.
I think that if you'd tell us what musicians you're thinking of we'd understand better what you're trying to get at.
 

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Wellllll? Actually the term "Dixieland" comes from the association of early jazz music with the American south. At the end of the 19th C. and into the 20th, Dixieland and Dixie were used widely in nostalgic type songs and music around the turn of 20th C. (give or take) and the term found its way into association with the New Orleans music that spread north.

The Original Dixieland Jazz Band was one of many to which the term was affixed but since they got the first punch in, recording-wise, it popularised the association of the term to this music. As jazz grew in its infancy, black musicians gradually separated themselves with this term and it became used predominantly regarding white New Orleans styled bands. The term was widely used in the 20s forward.

I believe the term "trad" actually began in Europe, probably England, as more traditionally oriented musicians and fans became polarised. That polarisation reached a peak in France where there was much stupid and vicious bickering between the trad and modernist (bebop) camps.

The use of the terms today is a bit blurred. Many moons ago, you would see jazz history eras divided as dixieland, swing, big band, bebop, post bop etc. Personally, I like to break up the early jazz eras into 1) New Orleans, and 2) Chicago (NY peripherally), rather than lumping them all under the blanket "Dixieland".

In around 1961 there was another revival of trad music which incorporated both New Orleans, Chicago and what was previously called Dixieland.

For contemporary definitions look under: Dodson, Dave. :D
 
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