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I play tenor sax mostly but the sax I play 2nd most is bari. I want to start on clarinet, should i start on bass clarinet or Bb soprano?
 

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The BC would be the easiest, as it has the most in common with the Tenor and Bari. In fact you can interchange Tenor and BC reeds.

A decent BC will cost more, you can find many Sop Clarinets for less.

You would have to work harder making the transition to the Sop Clarinet - you will need to remember to cover those tone holes for one thing.
 

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Um.... which one do YOU want to start on?
I say go for the soprano. It will kick your butt in a good way. ;)
 

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Bb soprano clarinet. Every doubler needs to play it. It's easily obtainable, relatively inexpensive, and is essential in theatre work.
 

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Um.... which one do YOU want to start on?
I say go for the soprano. It will kick your butt in a good way. ;)
When you figure out that the octave key isn't an octave key but a 12th key it'll blow your mind. I went from clarinet to sax and didn't find the transition too hard fingering-wise. What I found hardest was/is the embouchure. Clarinet is a much tighter embouchure. The lips and jaw have to be so much firmer than sax. I would say Bb soprano is the way to go. Start out with scales and arpeggios so you can get used to playing the break. That's the biggest challenge on clarinet, playing over the break. For me it seems a lot harder than sax.
 

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When you figure out that the octave key isn't an octave key but a 12th key it'll blow your mind.
... until you realize that the “octave key” is a “register key”, and all is well. :shock: :bluewink:
 

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Play the soprano clarinet - all the cool kids are doing it. Seriously though, for doubling purposes that is your best bet.
 

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Make your life easier. I recommend asking your Band Director what they need for your band/orchestra. If you don’t pick the clarinet they need, you will find yourself not playing it very much.
 

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A Bb soprano Yamaha.
I've never heard of a player starting clarinet on a bass.
A soprano has enough issues you will need to deal with without the added issues of a bass clarinet.
You get a decent bass (with a large heap of money!) after you have proven yourself with a soprano.
For several reasons, cheap bass clarinets can be very difficult to play.
Getting and keeping a bass clarinet without leaks is also quite a major issue.
 

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I would choose the one you prefer and like better, unless you have a practical reason that you put more weight on than your preference e.g. I started on Eb sopranino because I was too small for a Bb. Which one "speaks" to you in its tone, range, potential for what you can do with it, etc.
I play much more bass clarinet than soprano and although I don't regret starting with soprano, I don't think it's necessary.

It is more likely that someone practicing soprano clarinet would be better (or at least better faster) with bass, but not always. There are saxophone players who remain sucky on soprano and bass clarinets, and those who are great on bass with never even touching a soprano.

Weight while playing is obviously not an issue if you play bari sax, but consider taking and carrying it. The bass could mean an extra walk to/from the car, carrying another heavy case in addition, etc. The clarinet is easy to just take in addition to almost anything.

You already play bari and tenor, so you might like the low range of the bass, or you might prefer something higher and more different with a soprano.

Maybe you can have a lot more concerts with one vs. the other. Clarinet gigs are far more common than bass gigs, but clarinet players are far more common than bass clarinet players. A significant amount of my concerts are specifically because I play bass (though maybe not a good comparison because I don't play "standard" things anyway).

Clarinet is much cheaper, easier to get a good one, easier to be able to put it in a good condition. Reeds and everything else is cheaper too. Might be a consideration.

FWIW... I wanted to play clarinet when I was six. First place told me I can't, too young and small, I can start with recorder, or some other instrument like violin or cello. They did nothing but make a kid cry :)
Luckily I found a teacher who had the idea to start on the sopranino. It was very uncommon and it was generally accepted (at least back then) that kids don't start with clarinet until they are about nine or ten years old.
 
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