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To those who prefer shellac over hot glue to install sax pads, what brand(s) do you buy. I am familiar with Allied's amber sticks that sell for about $37/doz. and use those for most of my work.

I have also tried Ferree's amber sticks that cost twice as much at about $74/doz. These are definitely better and easier to work with IMO, but I am not sure the difference is worth twice the cost.

Are there other opinions of these or of other brands others have tried?
 

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I don't like MM's shellac offering much. Too brittle, sets too fast...regardless of which color you choose.

I like this stuff from Allied...dunno what it's called but it looks like butterscotch. It isn't clear, it's opaque.

Also Ferrees has a couple I use...the amber and then another which is a darker, almost opaque brown/amber.

The workability of the Allied and Ferrees are preferable for me.
 

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My favorite so far is amber shellac from Ferree's. I don't think I have tried the shellac from Allied. I don't like the white shellac (aka French cement) from any supplier I've tried it. I really don't like the black shellac from Music Medic. The amber shellac from Kraus is good but I think I prefer what I got from Ferree's. Seems a bit less brittle, but hard to say, possible to have some differences even from the same supplier. I'm trying Music Medic transparent and amber shellac now so will see how they are. I think I also liked the amber shellac from Windcraft (if I remember I liked it pretty much the same as Ferree's, but was a while a go so not sure).
 

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I buy flake shellac from Ferrees and make my own sticks. I make them a little larger in diameter than a #2 pencil and about the same length as that pencil. Very easy to control.
 

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I prefer to use dark shellac which I buy in button form - This stuff- http://www.axminster.co.uk/liberon-liberon-button-shellac-prod21665/
and make my own sticks

I have also tried the Yamaha shellac sticks which were great but needed more heat to melt.

I also use the flakes for certain applications - e.g. in small pad cups on sop saxes.
 

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I put the buttons in some water in the microwave, then melt the shellac slightly and then remove and roll into handy sized sticks.
Wow, when I learned how to make sticks from flakes back in the dark ages (1970's) microwave ovens weren't very common. The way I learned is quite tricky and can be painful if you get the shellac too hot. I'll have to try the microwave method!!! Old dog new tricks time.
 

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What are the advantages of making your own sticks from flakes or buttons of shellac?

the buttons are readily available form my local hardware store (ironmongers in the UK) and are always on the shelf whenever I go in. So for me its convenience to make my own rather than have to order some.

I prefer to use sticks over the buttons as I dont burn my fingers as often!
 

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Wow, when I learned how to make sticks from flakes back in the dark ages (1970's) microwave ovens weren't very common. The way I learned is quite tricky and can be painful if you get the shellac too hot. I'll have to try the microwave method!!! Old dog new tricks time.
make sure you use an old bowl/ vessel to put in the microwave as some of the shellac will stick to it and its hard to remove.
 

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I have tried quite a few, but not tried Musicmedic's yet. I do like Ferrees amber best so far. (Windcraft is likely the same. Allied quite likely is too.)

Ferrees seems less brittle than Kraus's.

Black and white are probably rather different because they would need a fair amount of filler/pigment in it.
Clear has been through a bleaching process, which, judging from what I have experienced, seems to make it more brittle.

To me, brittle is the quality we want minimised in shellac sticks.
 

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Stewart macdonald sells the music medic types of shellack & are very well priced, I dont know if he sources from them but imagine they do....well worth checking out. I just got about two dozen sticks from them in today.........
 

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I put the buttons in some water in the microwave, then melt the shellac slightly and then remove and roll into handy sized sticks.
I just tried (and failed miserably) to heat some shellac flakes on alum. foil in a cooking pot, hoping to be able to roll the foil.
Sounds like the microwave method may have more success.

What do you use to roll the shellac?

Cheers,

Dave
 

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I have tried quite a few, but not tried Musicmedic's yet. I do like Ferrees amber best so far. (Windcraft is likely the same. Allied quite likely is too.)

Ferrees seems less brittle than Kraus's. .
I have now given Musimedic's a good trial, and I much prefer the Ferrees. (Is it correct that the Musicmedic stuff is not actually shellac at all, but a synthetic copy?)

I find Musicmedic's more messy to heat over a flame and apply to the back of a pad, and it seems to remain mobile for longer as the key cup is cooled. Both qualities I don't want when I am working fast. Otherwise fine.
 

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Stick shellac in various colors was used as far back as the 19th century for crack and scratch repair on furniture finishes. The most common came from the ML Campbell Company in Kansas City. Stick shellacs are still available today from furniture finish businesses, but with the rise in various -urethane finishes, the formulation of the newer stick shellacs has been altered, more waxy.

When I started as a repairman (1974), I learned from a repairman (we weren't techs yet) who had gone to the Conn School directly after World War II. He taught me to use Campbell's #14 for sax pads. Ferree's is the closest to this. (He also taught me to use a product like Allied's "....a true cream-colored..." shellac for clarinets and piccolos, etc.) I've used the Allied product that jbtsax refers to, and indeed, it is a good adhesive. But it spends too much time in a plastic state--neither solid nor liquid--when heated, and in a business where time often equates to money, not a quality you want when you've got a certain rhythm going at the bench, as Gordon says. These newer furniture refinishing products are like this, and I think this is what Curt sells.

Lefty
 
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