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Discussion Starter #1
What is this (upside-down marcato)? My best guess is staccatissimo, but I have never seen it look like this (or in big band notation whatsoever).

Notation is from Dave Grusin's arrangement of "Side by Side", alto sax part.
View attachment 230984
 

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Discussion Starter #4
saxoclese said:
In a jazz chart my best guess is that those are a "misprint" and were intended to be "housetop" accents.
I thought so too at first, but as you can see, normal accents as well as "housetops" also occur within the same arrangement.
 

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That's a first for me. In my 40 odd yrs of playing/reading big band charts, I've never seen that one!
I'd say it's a simple, yet stunning example of someone going overboard with articulation(s). Especially since regular staccato's and "rooftop" accents also appear in the arrangement, I'd say it's not a misprint. Personally, I'd treat it as a typical/plain staccato or rooftop accent over a dotted eighth note. Meaning just to play it short and move on with more important things in life. ;-)
 

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That's a first for me. In my 40 odd yrs of playing/reading big band charts, I've never seen that one!
I'd say it's a simple, yet stunning example of someone going overboard with articulation(s). Especially since regular staccato's and "rooftop" accents also appear in the arrangement, I'd say it's not a misprint. Personally, I'd treat it as a typical/plain staccato or rooftop accent over a dotted eighth note. Meaning just to play it short and move on with more important things in life. ;-)
At any kind of moderate or faster tempo, you couldn't do housetops there anyway.

I interpret it as for those few notes you play a true dotted eighth-sixteenth with a little detachment between them, rather than swung eighths. Normally you'd just put dots. I have no idea why the up bow marks got in there.

I've been reading big band charts about as long, and I still see new screwy stuff every so often. The latest one was what I called a "baritone sax part kit" where about half the notes were just flat wrong, because the thing was in a bunch of flats and the computer screwed up all the accidentals, introducing unneeded double-sharps, etc., etc., obviously being caused by transposition. I frequently see charts that call for the low A (I don't have a low A baritone) but this was the first one I think I've ever seen that called for a low Ab! After about the third "note check" where the director and I both ended scratching our heads, I just told him "to heck with this, I'm just going to play the right notes and never mind what the part says."

My favorite, though, was the baritone sax part written in bass clef. You say, what's so tough about that? You just add three sharps and read it off the page. No, this one was written in bass clef, but it was transposed for an Eb instrument!

I also remember the one that - believe it or not - was written for "Bari sax in F" and transposed just that way!

And then there's stuff like the guy whose eighth rests, quarter rests, flats, and natural signs all looked the same. that was just a couple weeks ago. Oy vey!
 

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In my experience, total ignorance when it comes to the subjects of written and sounding range of instruments is not really a hallmark of a good arranger.

The same goes for the lack of ability or absolute minimum of professional pride required to actually review the parts output from notation software to look for obvious snafu’s before releasing them into the wild.

Life is too short, don’t waste time on crap arrangements.
 

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On a hunch I looked at the style markings my Finale program and found that the above accent is shown both ways. It is typically written in the usual "housetop" fashion above the heads of notes with the stems going down, but on notes lower in the staff with the stems going up and the accent mark is below the head of the note the program prints the inverted mark. Obviously it represents the same accent, but it looks odd when it is not used in the proper context.
 

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In my experience, total ignorance when it comes to the subjects of written and sounding range of instruments is not really a hallmark of a good arranger.

The same goes for the lack of ability or absolute minimum of professional pride required to actually review the parts output from notation software to look for obvious snafu’s before releasing them into the wild.

Life is too short, don’t waste time on crap arrangements.
This is why we used to use copyists. I did that a few times myself. Thankless, tiresome work, but at least it didn't pay well!

I say this as one of the programmers on Encore, the now defunct notation program that used to be preferred by Hollywood copyists! (In fact my few gigs of real copy work is probably why I got the job at Passport...)
 

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In my experience, total ignorance when it comes to the subjects of written and sounding range of instruments is not really a hallmark of a good arranger.

The same goes for the lack of ability or absolute minimum of professional pride required to actually review the parts output from notation software to look for obvious snafu’s before releasing them into the wild.

Life is too short, don’t waste time on crap arrangements.
+1 This is why we used to use copyists. I did that a few times myself. Thankless, tiresome work, but at least it didn't pay well!

I say this as one of the programmers on Encore, the now defunct notation program that used to be preferred by Hollywood copyists! (In fact my few gigs of real copy work is probably why I got the job at Passport...)
 
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