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Hi all,

I remember having seen a great concert of the Texas Tenors Arnett Cobb, Illinois Jacquet and Buddy Tate at the North Sea Jazz Festival in The Netherlands back in 1982 (on Sunday July the 15th, to be precise).

I recently found a great youtube video of the same group performing in Berlin in that same year. It's a feature of Arnett Cobb playing the wonderful ballad 'The Nearness of You'. In that period Arnett played this ballad very often (I've seen him live about 16 times) and had his own way of playing it. His sound is (as always) overwhelming. Other nice moments are his great intro and ending (watch the face of piano player Wild Bill Davis!) and his special way to play a high G at 5:24: it sounds a bit like a horse! Here is the link:

Arnett Cobb in 'The Nearness of You':
- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UKy0fa1SjvA

For those who want to hear more of Arnett, check below links to other SOTW threads:

Tenor Battle of NSJ 1979 (including Illinois Jacquet, Buddy Tate, Budd Johnson and Dexter Gordon), with several links. One link has Arnett playing 'Deep Purple'. IMO this clip represents his sound the best compared to how he sounded live:
- http://forum.saxontheweb.net/showth...er-Gordon-and-Illinois-Jacquet-in-Flying-Home and
- http://forum.saxontheweb.net/showthread.php?145624-Great-Arnett-Cobb-solo-on-Deep-Purple

Tenor Battle in Laren 1984 (including Eddie 'Lockjaw' Davis and Johnny Griffin), with several links. One link has Arnett playing another version of 'The Nearness Of You' (only audio), nice to compare it with the above version:
- http://forum.saxontheweb.net/showth...kjaw-Davis-and-Johnny-Griffin-KILLING-VERSION!!!

Enjoy!!!
 

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Wow. Arnett Cobb wasn't no joke! (excuse the bad English he he he). A true master, and what a sound! I like when he gets to the cadenza and he uses his horn to begin a discussion with Jacquet and Tate. They were on a whole 'nuther level.
 

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Kinda' like Stanley Turrentine, but better. And what guts to be out there playing while propped up on crutches, that must have been incredibly difficult. Awesome! Thanks Mrpeebee.
Actually Stanley Turrentine was influenced by Arnett Cobb (see page 30 in the booklet via the link below).

The crutches came after a car accident in 1956 (see page 26 in the booklet). They put a lot of metal plates in his legs, what made him very immobile, not being able to bend his legs properly. He was taken to a Dutch hospital in the 80's to check if they could improve things, but nothing could be done (too much adhesions). Happily for us those crutches and the pain he must have had didn't stop him from touring all over the world since the late 70's to the end of his live (1989) and sounding as strong as not many players can sound on the saxophone :).

A fantastic source of information on Arnett Cobb can be found via this link (it contains beautiful stories and old pictures):
http://issuu.com/nicquemont/docs/arnettcobb_booklet_web
 

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mrpeebee, thanks much for those youtube (an other) links. WOW..... Arnett, Jacquet, etc. had THE best, biggest and bad-*** tenor sounds ever. Talk about a lost art. Of all the excellent players around today......at least the ones who are putting out recordings of themselves, you just do NOT hear that type of sound anymore. Sad really....

Again, thanks much!

John
 

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mrpeebee, thanks much for those youtube (an other) links. WOW..... Arnett, Jacquet, etc. had THE best, biggest and bad-*** tenor sounds ever. Talk about a lost art. Of all the excellent players around today......at least the ones who are putting out recordings of themselves, you just do NOT hear that type of sound anymore. Sad really....

Again, thanks much!

John

Indeed John, you don't hear that style often anymore. It's very demanding sounding like that, you have to put a lot of energy in your playing. These days most players are more interested in technique then in getting a big sound. Here in Netherlands we still have some guys who try to play like the Texas Tenors. I'm one of them, but without much success :bluewink:. But pro players like Rinus Groeneveld and Boris van der Lek can do that quite well. Others like Hans Dulfer, Wouter Kiers and Ruud de Vries also do those kind of things (besides playing other stuff to survive).

If you are interested in hearing some clips of Rinus Groeneveld (IMO the best player in that style here in Holland) and Wouter Kiers, check this SOTW thread:
http://forum.saxontheweb.net/showth...Netherlands-Rinus-Groeneveld-and-Wouter-Kiers

I guess you still have some guys in US playing like that too.
 

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Again, thanks much for the links! They're all excellent players. Somewhat in "the vein" but still nothing like the original guys.....then again, when ever is anything as good as the original?!

Best..
John
 

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Indeed John, you don't hear that style often anymore. It's very demanding sounding like that, you have to put a lot of energy in your playing. These days most players are more interested in technique then in getting a big sound. Here in Netherlands we still have some guys who try to play like the Texas Tenors. I'm one of them, but without much success :bluewink:. But pro players like Rinus Groeneveld and Boris van der Lek can do that quite well. Others like Hans Dulfer, Wouter Kiers and Ruud de Vries also do those kind of things (besides playing other stuff to survive).

If you are interested in hearing some clips of Rinus Groeneveld (IMO the best player in that style here in Holland) and Wouter Kiers, check this SOTW thread:
http://forum.saxontheweb.net/showth...Netherlands-Rinus-Groeneveld-and-Wouter-Kiers

I guess you still have some guys in US playing like that too.
It's probably easier to get away with in Europe. US players kind of have to show technique to get respect. Lyricism is sometimes taken for granted - something for old cats to fall back on - which doesn't say much for the tastes of our jazz audience.
 

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Could be Paul (I don't the US scene of these days to well). Here in Holland we also have an army of gifted Trane followers and happilly most 'schools' get a willing ear here in my country (also avant-garde).
 
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