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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2009
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Discussion Starter #1
I did a practice with Kride video on You tube about prepping for a jam session and heres my confession. https://youtu.be/53KEuTxoMPE

I blew it. I prepped staying behind the beat, building lines with great phrasing and space, doing sub chords and scales. Then at the Jam session I threw all that out the window and did the Keith imitates Sanborn show. as I say in my video. Theres nothing wrong with how I did the jam session. its just not what I wanted to do. Ohh well you just keep working and trying to get better. Ksaxman.com
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2009
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Discussion Starter #3
I didn't . When I drove over to the jam I had no idea who would be there. So I wasn't expecting it to go very well K
 

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I practice a lot of things that don't 'show up' when I play a gig or go to a jam, either because I haven't fully internalized them or because they aren't suitable for the tune(s) being played. I find that to be useful, a given concept, lick, ii-V line, diminished line, chord arpeggio, phrasing, etc, etc, has to become internalized to the point it comes out naturally in a solo on the bandstand. If you force it, you'll often just screw it up. But the good news is those things you really drill and work on will eventually become internalized and part of your 'tool box' if you just keep working them. But it takes time.
 

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I did a practice with Kride video on You tube about prepping for a jam session and heres my confession. https://youtu.be/53KEuTxoMPE

I blew it. I prepped staying behind the beat, building lines with great phrasing and space, doing sub chords and scales. Then at the Jam session I threw all that out the window and did the Keith imitates Sanborn show. as I say in my video.
Keith Ridenhour, maybe you tried to over-control the chain of ideas that you prepared for the jam. There is one point missing from the list of what you trained : work not only on learning the phrases, but also on the natural ease and fluidity of spilling out of improvised phrases and their development; which requires flexibility and quick self reaction . In this case, it is enough to prepare the initial phrase for the solo, as well as approximately what will be at the climax; and then you firmly know how to begin and what you strive for. In the end, you can think about returning to song, even if it is not so in a real situation; so you have three key points that you can rely on during improvisation - rather than to control the entire sequence elaborated phrases.
The jam situation just doesn't support this. I remember the jam from the late 70s, when one saxophonist, who returned fresh from Berklee, announced that he wanted to play "Giant Steps", and at a fast pace - that he naturally learned in school with teacher. But when went to solo, it turned out that he plays a note by note Coltrane's solo; and when he forgot some note, he immediately stopped and asked to start over. When my turn came, I had no problem playing the solo (at the piano), because has trained at home exactly as indicated above.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2009
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5,375 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thanks jl , i' hope that happens.
i practice a lot of things that don't 'show up' when i play a gig or go to a jam, either because i haven't fully internalized them or because they aren't suitable for the tune(s) being played. I find that to be useful, a given concept, lick, ii-v line, diminished line, chord arpeggio, phrasing, etc, etc, has to become internalized to the point it comes out naturally in a solo on the bandstand. If you force it, you'll often just screw it up. But the good news is those things you really drill and work on will eventually become internalized and part of your 'tool box' if you just keep working them. But it takes time.
 
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