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Is there anybody that studied with Warne Marsh?
 

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I love his playing!! One of the under-represented artists in my audio collection.

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Sivarix said:
Is there anybody that studied with Warne Marsh?
I was fortunate to take some lessons from Warne Marsh in 1975. However, I was a rank beginner as an improviser and my lessons were on the foundation aspects of improv. He stressed ear training by singing intervals and also singing chords as an arpeggio. He had me learn a Lester Young solo from a recording (I chose the solo from "All of Me" on a Billie Holiday recording). The stages of learning the solo were: listen to it enough so I could sing along with the record, then sing it without the record, then play sax with the record, and finally without the record. He stressed learning all the inflections and phrasing, and especially keeping steady time.
He also had an exercise of playing a melodic pattern, repeating it on different scales. This drilled in the particular scale and also the melodic pattern. This was all done by ear. It got really challenging when he started the pattern on something other than the downbeat of the measure. (That was something I was not able to manage.)
One of Warne's main teaching concerns was steady tempo. He wanted me to play with a metronome whenever possible.
Another thing he had me do was memorize chord progressions to a few standards (I chose "Body and Soul", "All of Me" and "All the Things You Are"). He had me learn the progression a couple bars at a time, by playing the chord tones as quarter notes, then eighth notes, and finally as a running pattern of eighth note scales that fits within the chord progression. With that foundation, it ingrained the chord progression in the subconscious and also developed the ear.
I was only able to study with Warne for a little less than a year, and I felt like I was starting to make progress when I had to stop. After that time, my involvement in improv has been spotty, so my improv skills are modest at this point.
When I studied with Warne, he was considered to be "the Man" in L.A. to teach jazz improv. He had a lot of really good students, some of them on a very high level (not me). I remember my exposure to him with great fondness.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
saxfreak said:
I was fortunate to take some lessons from Warne Marsh in 1975. However, I was a rank beginner as an improviser and my lessons were on the foundation aspects of improv. He stressed ear training by singing intervals and also singing chords as an arpeggio. He had me learn a Lester Young solo from a recording (I chose the solo from "All of Me" on a Billie Holiday recording). The stages of learning the solo were: listen to it enough so I could sing along with the record, then sing it without the record, then play sax with the record, and finally without the record. He stressed learning all the inflections and phrasing, and especially keeping steady time.
He also had an exercise of playing a melodic pattern, repeating it on different scales. This drilled in the particular scale and also the melodic pattern. This was all done by ear. It got really challenging when he started the pattern on something other than the downbeat of the measure. (That was something I was not able to manage.)
One of Warne's main teaching concerns was steady tempo. He wanted me to play with a metronome whenever possible.
Another thing he had me do was memorize chord progressions to a few standards (I chose "Body and Soul", "All of Me" and "All the Things You Are"). He had me learn the progression a couple bars at a time, by playing the chord tones as quarter notes, then eighth notes, and finally as a running pattern of eighth note scales that fits within the chord progression. With that foundation, it ingrained the chord progression in the subconscious and also developed the ear.
I was only able to study with Warne for a little less than a year, and I felt like I was starting to make progress when I had to stop. After that time, my involvement in improv has been spotty, so my improv skills are modest at this point.
When I studied with Warne, he was considered to be "the Man" in L.A. to teach jazz improv. He had a lot of really good students, some of them on a very high level (not me). I remember my exposure to him with great fondness.
Thanks for sharing your experience!
Did he put the metronome on every beat or two and four, etc.?
 
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