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Some people said that the air blows out from the mouth when playing sax is cool. However, someone think that it is more prefered to use warm air in playing low register. Is it true?
 

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Warm air=warm sound. I always strive for warm air.
 

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I am in the US Navy. We had a promotion ceremony and I was asked to play the Star Spangled Banner for it.
When I played it was little above 10 degrees and outside. I think you get the picture. It was cold. I found it a little tougher to my Sax in tune in the lower register. The performance was recorded. It sounded pretty good when I listened to it. I did definitely sound different.
Due to this experience, I think the temperature of air does affect the Sax sound and the lower temperature.
 

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camry said:
Some people said that the air blows out from the mouth when playing sax is cool. However, someone think that it is more prefered to use warm air in playing low register. Is it true?
Is it possible to affect the temperature of the air coming out of your mouth into the horn? Ice cube under your tongue???:?
 

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The idea of warm air vs. cold air has to do with the voicings you use, i. d. with the different shape your oral cavity can take. It's more a mental thing, the air itself is probably of the same temperature.

Blow out warm air against the palm of your hand. In order to do so, you'll use a broad, rather unfocused stream of air. This is what you'll need for low tones, too.

Blow our cold air agains the palm of your hand. In order to do so, you'll use a narrow, rather focused stream of air. This is what you'll need for high tones, too.
 

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It's more a mental thing, the air itself is probably of the same temperature.
I believe you are correct. The "cool" sensation of focused air has to do with the velocity, similar to the way standing in front of a window fan feels cooler than standing in front of an open window. More air speed means more evaporation of moisture from the skin's surface and that lowers the surface temperature.

However, as a way to differentiate between two approaches to blowing, I think the concept is fine.
 

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I think that "Toot Sweet" is right. It is more of a voicing thing.

Think of what you do to fog up a mirror or piece of glass. You don't just blow on it. You open your throat wide and breathe "warm" air on it.

Now do the same thing when playing on the low end....
 

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dirvin said:
I think that "Toot Sweet" is right. It is more of a voicing thing.

Think of what you do to fog up a mirror or piece of glass. You don't just blow on it. You open your throat wide and breathe "warm" air on it.

Now do the same thing when playing on the low end....
... but stick a thermometer in front and the temperature will be the same. But somebody could design a pedal you press to squirt crushed ice into your mouth to hit a low Bb. Last note you'll ever play!
 
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