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Hey guys,

Browsing through this forum, I read that Vito flutes are often made by Yamaha, the 113s being Yamaha 200 series flutes with the Vito name stenciled on them. Well I have an opportunity to buy a Vito 113, however the seller claims she can't find "Made In Japan" anywhere on the flute. Are some of these flutes made by other companies or are they all Yamaha's? I can't seem to find anything concrete on the web. Thanks everyone.

Evan
 

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I have come across a couple. They had Yamaha 200 series bodies with a different (and not as nice) headjoint. They sell on ebay very cheaply.
 

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I don't know which models they have been, but none of the many Vito flutes I have worked on play as well as student Yamaha.
A different head joint could well account for that.
 

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The comments about the clunky head joints are most enlightening. I have a Vito flute, but the head joint all over just feels too heavy and thick. The bad part is that I spent a lot of money for this flute, which I have only played once in 7 years. I think I'll donate it to some charitable group, and buy a replacement flute of the make like the one I learned on (I'm not mentioning the company name, but it sounds German.)
 

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Oh, how I wish I had had these comments to read 7 years ago! Agreed. I played the thing only once, packed it away, and it has sat on a shelf ever since.
 

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... I think I'll donate it to some charitable group, and buy a replacement flute of the make like the one I learned on (I'm not mentioning the company name, but it sounds German.)
Do you mean the long-name brand that is well known for having a head that is disappointing to play? I regard them as somewhat obsolete. That sound and response was vastly improved on by many makers, a long time ago. I reckon the main reason they are still enjoy significant sales (in USA) is misguided nationalistic pride. (And are they still even made in USA?) At least try Yamaha.
 

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I happened to stumble upon this thread and have a high opinion of "My" Vito flute.
Don't know the model number but it says "Japan" on the body. When I had it shimmed, the pads had "Yamaha" printed on them. This flute is a back-up for my Haynes. It's louder than the Haynes and is a closed hole offset G, C foot. I use it when the playing venue is crowded & rough to protect the Haynes. Very easy playing and inexpensive but does the job. In general, no one would ever know which flute I was playing. I got it in the '90's & like it a lot.They're not all bad.
 

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I happened to stumble upon this thread and have a high opinion of "My" Vito flute.
Don't know the model number but it says "Japan" on the body. When I had it shimmed, the pads had "Yamaha" printed on them. This flute is a back-up for my Haynes. It's louder than the Haynes and is a closed hole offset G, C foot. I use it when the playing venue is crowded & rough to protect the Haynes. Very easy playing and inexpensive but does the job. In general, no one would ever know which flute I was playing. I got it in the '90's & like it a lot.They're not all bad.
Curious,
If you record, playing solo, do they sound the same other than the amplitude difference?
 

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Cane: No, they don't sound the same when recorded, the Haynes has a quality that the Vito doesn't have. But my point was that in a live situation not many people would be able to discern the fact that it's an inexpensive flute. Especially through a sound system that might even enhance the sound with reverb etc. Unless it's an all acoustic band, most live music is essentially electronic music because of mics, amps, speakers etc. and that's not the true sound of the instruments.
 

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Caine: The very old Haynes (handmade, thin-wall) I once had, although extremely even in tone and response across the registers, was disappointing in volume compared with a modern student Yamaha. (I'd prefer to play the Yamaha.)
So I do not regard an old Haynes as a yardstick for flutes. Student Yamaha is.
 
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