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It's incredible the number of times I am seeing instruments, in general, being referred to as being "Vintage". I have my own interpretation of its meaning, that being, something that is very old. ie pre 1960's. No doubt others have their own interpretation of the meaning of the Vintage word as well. I just think it is being over used and used where it should not be. What is your interpretation...without going to Webster's!!:argue3::wink:
 

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Personally I laugh when I see a current production horn is marketed as 'vintage'. If it's not been in production for many years I usually don't mind.

Doesn't change whether or not I am buying a horn though!
 

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I think here in BC cars can get vintage plates or vintage insurance plans when they are 25 years or older. That's too young imo to be considered vintage. But I'd say 40.

The term vintage really just means of a certain era. It's a 70's vintage, a 60's vintage, so on and so forth.
 

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I think in general usage, the term "Vintage" implies over 30 years old, "Antique" implies over 100.

For something specific like saxophones, I tend to interpret "vintage" as meaning older (archaic or non-'modern') design horns with elements such as in-line tone holes, forked Eb, etc. which are no longer found on 'modern' design horns; rather than a specific number of years.
 

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Like a '70's US Bundy may technically be "vintage"...and a sax, but it's not a "vintage sax".
 

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In my mind, not knowing a heck of a lot more than what I've picked up here over the last few years, anything designed before the Mark VI would be vintage. As I understand it the Mark VI was the instrument that changed the layout of the pinky keys from a flat table to something very different where the keys fit the ergonomics of actual human anatomy. Correct me if I'm wrong but I'd say that was a major leap forward in the technology of saxophone design. That and moving the mechanics on the right side of the instrument toward the middle so they don't rub against the clothing of the player. So anything before those changes would be considered "vintage" and anything after would be considered "modern". Tell me that makes any sense.
 
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