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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Please share your wisdom, I have a gold 1924 Conn C melody. Tried jewellery silver polish cloth and it doesn't work. I don't want to stuff it up. Please advise what I should use. Also, after I polished it, is it OK to use lacquer polish on it? It doesn't seem to be "laqcuer" finish as such, but I would like to protect the sax as much as possible. Thank you for your advice.
 

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Go easy on it is the first rule. It's not clear from the photo what exactly you've got - it could be an original satin gold plate, but the rudimentary engraving is not usuallly what you see on Conns with that finish; it could be an original polished brass that's later been lacquered, but it kind of looks like satin; or it could have been an original satin silver that was stripped down to brass when the fad was to get rid of all silver plate horns and turn to brass.

If it's gold plate then you could have both dirt (which you can clean off by normal means) or a darkening of the plating by oxidation of the silver layer underneath. Unless you really know what you're doing, that case would call for leaving it alone as application of any kind of abrasive is likely to risk taking off the very thin layer of gold.

If it's polished brass that's been lacquered, then you can clean it, but using any kind of abrasive polish will only shine areas where the lacquer's been lost through wear. And those areas will shine up overly bright, then re-tarnish. It's also possible for abrasive polishes to remove remaining lacquer, which you don't want to do.

About the only saxophone finish where using polish on it is of any benefit is silver plate, which is thick enough that you're not going to wear through it with standard polish (Simichrome or equivalent) and which will actually be positively affected by being polished up.

I have no idea what "lacquer polish" is supposed to be.
 

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The texture and color suggests to me that it is gold plated. I do electroplating in my shop and have a lot of experience "polishing" gold. I have used Connoisseurs gold polish cloths extensively and get good results. A trick I learned is to exhale into the cloth a few times to moisten it with the water vapor in your breath. It makes it even more effective. Once the surface is polished, it is important to turn the cloth over and buff the part with the non polishing side.
 

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I have no idea what "lacquer polish" is supposed to be.
Meguiars has a series of products intended for lacquer finishes. I use them on my guitars, but not my silverplated or silver finishes (Hagerty products for those).
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Go easy on it is the first rule. It's not clear from the photo what exactly you've got - it could be an original satin gold plate, but the rudimentary engraving is not usuallly what you see on Conns with that finish; it could be an original polished brass that's later been lacquered, but it kind of looks like satin; or it could have been an original satin silver that was stripped down to brass when the fad was to get rid of all silver plate horns and turn to brass.

If it's gold plate then you could have both dirt (which you can clean off by normal means) or a darkening of the plating by oxidation of the silver layer underneath. Unless you really know what you're doing, that case would call for leaving it alone as application of any kind of abrasive is likely to risk taking off the very thin layer of gold.

If it's polished brass that's been lacquered, then you can clean it, but using any kind of abrasive polish will only shine areas where the lacquer's been lost through wear. And those areas will shine up overly bright, then re-tarnish. It's also possible for abrasive polishes to remove remaining lacquer, which you don't want to do.

About the only saxophone finish where using polish on it is of any benefit is silver plate, which is thick enough that you're not going to wear through it with standard polish (Simichrome or equivalent) and which will actually be positively affected by being polished up.

I have no idea what "lacquer polish" is supposed to be.
Thank you for the in-depth info, I didn't realise it could be THAT complicated. It's a strange finish, not smooth and got small bits peeling, so I don't want to make it worse, but rather, to protect it. Below is lacquer polish that I got. the description says "The Lacquer Polish by Yamaha removes dirt from lacquered surfaces and leaves a beautiful, fine-textured gloss helping to prolong the life of the finish."
Liquid Bottle Fluid Plastic bottle Font
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The texture and color suggests to me that it is gold plated. I do electroplating in my shop and have a lot of experience "polishing" gold. I have used Connoisseurs gold polish cloths extensively and get good results. A trick I learned is to exhale into the cloth a few times to moisten it with the water vapor in your breath. It makes it even more effective. Once the surface is polished, it is important to turn the cloth over and buff the part with the non polishing side.
just bought one, thank you for the tip! I wish I could bring my sax to a pro, but I am in NZ ;(
 

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Qalina, I don't think the Yamaha "lacquer polish" - probably meant for guitars - can possibly harm the finish of your horn, whether it's lacquered brass or gold plate. Try it. I doubt it will do much of anything, but if it can't hurt, why not?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Qalina, I don't think the Yamaha "lacquer polish" - probably meant for guitars - can possibly harm the finish of your horn, whether it's lacquered brass or gold plate. Try it. I doubt it will do much of anything, but if it can't hurt, why not?
It's listed on the website of the reputable saxophone dealer, so definitely for horns, this one. P.S added-it's actually for both -guitars and horns! (it says so at the bottom)
 

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Well, it's probably some kind of a light oil in a carrier that evaporates, so it makes such finishes seem shinier. It might also help in removing general dirt and grime. It almost certainly won't do anything to change the color of tarnished metal.
 
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