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Hi, I have an alto Besson London s/n 41193. It has many features typical for hi-end horns of pre WWII era such as rolled tone holes, all mother of pearl keys, microtuner neck, trill D# and G# keys and unusual roller on Bb valve. I think it's a stencil of good manufacturer and I wonder wich. I post a few photos. Please if you have any idea who can made this sax tell me.
 

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there is a very good chance that Besson actually made this horn, although there are some SML characteristics, very beautiful!
 

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No doubt at all: G.H.Hüller of Schöneck, Germany. The 'pinky table', bell-body brace and roller bis key are all very distinctive, as is the keywork style in general. What makes me absolutely certain is the '870' stamp on the neck tenon receiver. As far as I know, this is unique to G.H.Hüller, and indicates a pitch an octave above A=435, rather than the usual A=440.

So the instrument is pitched a little below modern 'low pitch'. (A=435 is an obsolete French standard called 'diapason normal' which was widely adopted outside France until about 1939.) I had one of these and found the difference to be a challenge: the sax was well in tune with itself against a tuner set at A=435; but it was hard work to bring the bottom end up to A=440 without the top being seriously sharp. If you really want to play one of these at A=440, mouthpiece choice and embouchure control will be crucial.
 
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