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I was watching the DVD by Walter Beasley which discusses vibrato and the use of using the jaw to control vibrato. I tried this technique and thought it was a little akward.

I then had a sax teacher (substitue) who showed me vibrato and he stated that it should be controlled by the bottom lip ever so slightly but it takes some practice to do it with finesse.

I wondering which way is the correct way. I'm thinking maybe the sax teacher is correct since he's been playing sax for 50+ years but then again some people play with incorrect techniques for that long.
 

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Jaw, diaphram, and shaking the horn (probably the worst way to do it, but I've seen it done) are all methods used. Quite a bit has already been discussed here on SOTW. I suggest you do a search and read about it rather than going through it all again. I use the jaw method, Sidney Bechet used the diaphragm method (not meaning to put myself in that league). DAVE
 

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i'd say jaw is the way to go on saxophone....i don't think it's quite the same as using your lip..and although using your lip is possible, it's not preferable. you want stability from your embouchure.
on a side note:
vibrato is more important to how good you sound than many realize. often i'll hear someone say "wow his tone is great", but it's really the vibrato that's making the sound great. in other words, it's worth practicing.
and just like any other technique, when you first start doing it, it will probably feel awkward. but keep at it.!
 

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Dave Dolson said:
Jaw, diaphram, and shaking the horn (probably the worst way to do it, but I've seen it done) are all methods used. Quite a bit has already been discussed here on SOTW. I suggest you do a search and read about it rather than going through it all again. I use the jaw method, Sidney Bechet used the diaphragm method (not meaning to put myself in that league). DAVE
Very interesting on Bechet. Is this something that Bechet explains himself somewhere or is it what others have deduced from recordings, film etc? I searched but no luck on this one. Does anyone know?
 

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Rooty: I don't recall reading that about Bechet, but listening to his playing (on clarinet, too - maybe clarinet is even a better example to assess his vibrato) leads me to believe it was diaphragm.

There were a few reedmen from Bechet's era that had that sound. Today's Bechet emulators also use that type of vibrato, but the technique is not popular outside of trad jazz (at least in my opinion). DAVE.
 

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I use the Jaw method and most players I know also do. The key is to build up your embouchure so that bottom lip is firm. The firmer your lip the better cushion it will be as your teeth apply pressure from the bottom. Make sure you don't make your vibrato too fast. That's something I constantly have to think about because I have that problem. Listen to Sanborn and Christlieb they both have tremendous control and technique when it comes to vibratos.
 

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Jaw is the standard "correct" way and the one that the majority of sax players use, though some have certainly had success with the other ways. Personally, I've never had a teacher who didn't use or teach the jaw method.

I believe it offers the greatest degree of control and it makes it easier to vary the depth and rate of the vibrato.
 

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I have to say that as a serious student of the oboe before saxo, the throat vibrato works beautifully on our instrument if diligently maintained, but it is terribly difficult to impossible in altissimo. My opinion is that the subtlest jaw motion (think chewing muscles) yields the best, most supple and flexible single reed vibrato.

Angel
 

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There was a post below about Bechet and (possible) diaphram vibrato. This set me thinking about the employment of different forms of vibrato, at different times, for different purposes (Bechet being a supreme artist, natch, most recognisable sound on sax of perhaps any player) so we can't say a priori that diaphram vibrato is wrong and even if there wasn't Bechet we couldn't say it was "wrong", in my book). Has anyone got any experience in this area?
 
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