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how are people performing vibrato on the clarinet? i feel comfortable doing it with the air stream but havent been able to get my speed up. i don't play sax and haven't learned to do it with the lip/jaw. how are others doing it? Thanks
Jess
p.s. not here to incite a style argument :bluewink:
 

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Classical clarinetists do not use vibrato. Now, if you're using it in jazz, I personally use jaw vibrato, and have no problem with it, however, I'm also completely self taught on clarinet.
 

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Richard Stoltzman certainly uses it in his recording of the Brahms Sonatas. It sounds to me that he uses airstream vibrato in his classical playing (sparingly), and jaw vibrato (as appropriate) in his jazz playing.
 

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Stotz is the perhaps the only one I can think of other that uses Vibrato in classical. Generally, you don't do it. And if you do do it, then it's the same as saxophone.
 

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Richard Stoltzman certainly uses it in his recording of the Brahms Sonatas. It sounds to me that he uses airstream vibrato in his classical playing (sparingly), and jaw vibrato (as appropriate) in his jazz playing.
...and I wish he hadn't.:) Harold Wright also uses a very subtle vibrato in his recordings with Peter Serkin, but his interpretation is much more to my liking.
 

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Classical Clarinetist rarely use vibrato or never.
It's rather unorthodox to clarinet playing as your embouchure cannot move at all for classical clarinet, if you do use vibrato while playing, you'll end up making the tone less focused, and might lead to embouchure air leaks.
I hear of clarinetists using diaphragm vibrato if they use vibrato though.
But it depends on what style you play, but then again, you could do whatever.
 

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One of the most distinctive clarinet vibratos in jazz

 

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There are more than a few players who use vibrato in classical music. A couple of examples are Paul Meyer and Gervase de Peyer. Most I heard use a type of 'air' vibrato i.e. not from the jaw moving. I use only jaw vibrato and the general type of music I play (classical, jazz, etc.) usually doesn't really matter, but the specific music does. Don't just blindly follow anyone, better to think why using something or not is better or worse.
 

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Clarinetists can and do use vibrato whenever the situation calls for it. It matters not which 'genre' you are playing.
The most commonly used form is 'jaw' vibrato. Think controled 'wawa'. It's so easy to control and you can go from very subtle to Acker Bilk with very little effort.
'Air' or diaphragm vibrato is also used by clarinetists but is more commonly used by double reed players and flautists.

When practicing jaw vibrato think of the peaks and valleys of a sine wave.
Start slow and broad, and gradually increase the speed. Don't get choppy! Keep the tops of the 'hills' and the bottoms of the 'valleys' rounded. Otherwise you'll sound like a machine gun and no one likes to hear THAT kind of vibrato.
 

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Old thread, but I enjoyed it and wanted to add these thoughts.

1. As a serious clarinetist, one would need to achieve that pure "pear-shaped" tone consistently before considering vibrato.
2. Some conductors will absolutely forbid vibrato on clarinet.
3. Having said 2. above, I note that, in symphonic or mixed woodwind quintet playing situations, it makes perfect sense to use vibrato when taking over a melodic line from a flute, oboe, or bassoon that is already using vibrato in the line.
Sax Magic
 
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