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What is the difference?

acoustimax has no handfinish and serial number.
Further? Is it that, for the acoustimax, you have to be lucky with rails and tip?
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2012
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Send a pm to forum member Sebastian and ask him.
He works for Ted Klum.
 

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What is the difference?

acoustimax has no handfinish and serial number.
Further? Is it that, for the acoustimax, you have to be lucky with rails and tip?
A couple months ago I tried 4 Acoustimer and 4 Acoutimax. They all played very well. The Acoustimer's chamber seemed to be larger from the ones I played. They were darker sounding than the Acoustimax. All 4 Acousitmax mouthpieces were perfect looking and playing. The chamber looked a tad smaller and the side scooped into the chamber more I think. (or at least the scoop looked different to me. It was very smooth. Not a bump or edge anywhere in the piece. The material that it is made of is a special material that is different than the hard rubber of the Acoustimer. I can't go into details but Frank was telling me all the chemistry and science behind it. The Acoustimax for me was brighter and more powerful than the Acoustimer. The Acoustimer was darker and was warmer sounding. I ended up taking a Acoustimax home after trying them all because I thought it was a great lead alto type of piece.
 

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What is the difference?

acoustimax has no handfinish and serial number.
Further? Is it that, for the acoustimax, you have to be lucky with rails and tip?
My understanding is the acoustimax requires less hand work because the blanks are very accurately produced hence the cheaper price. My acoustimax is nicely finished with excellent tip and side rails and plays very well...it's my only alto piece.
 

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Apologies to all for not seeing this thread.

In response to Rackety Sax, the two designs are different. The original VersiTone (Acoustimer) is more in line with a traditional medium chamber style alto mouthpiece with all of Ted's concepts applied to that design. If you were to compare it with a Meyer, you would notice a different baffle shape and that the chamber is larger. Big sound, nice darkness and a little bit of buzz to the sound.

The VersiTone Acoustimax is made from a completely different material and hence is manufactured in a different way. The material that it is made of allows it to be manufactured to very high tolerances and so, extremely close to the original design file. This translates into less time being required to get it to standard. Limiting it to a few size ranges allows for Ted to keep the cost down a little on this piece. This is one time where less expensive doesn't mean cheaper quality. The chamber is different than the Acoustimer cousin in that it has a clear-core (straight through shape), i.e. no squeeze. As a result, it might look like the chamber is narrower than the Acoustimer but it's not. The chamber tapers into perfectly conical sidewalls that taper completely into the corners. This means a punchier sound without resorting to high baffle, lots of fatness to the sound. A pleasant result of this design makes this the easiest to play in tune alto mouthpiece I've ever played. Check it out on a tuner!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=htfnEjRjaUo

Check out Jesse Davis on his Acoustimax D
 
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