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Ok here it goes another Dumb question i have a Eb alto jupiter sax when using my tuner i play a C on the sax i get a D# on the Tuner is that normal or is there something i need to change to get a C when i play a C, either on the horn or the tuner? please help me understand.:space3:
 

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Ok here it goes another Dumb question i have a Eb alto jupiter sax when using my tuner i play a C on the sax i get a D# on the Tuner is that normal or is there something i need to change to get a C when i play a C, either on the horn or the tuner? please help me understand.:space3:
OK, I know someone will chime in with a way more complicated answer BUT a D# is also what? It's an Eb or course, you have an Eb alto sax so when you play a C you get a concert Eb. So totally normal.
 

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Ok here it goes another Dumb question i have a Eb alto jupiter sax when using my tuner i play a C on the sax i get a D# on the Tuner is that normal or is there something i need to change to get a C when i play a C, either on the horn or the tuner? please help me understand.:space3:
Mike answered one question regarding transposing from concert key, which is what the tuner is displaying, to your alto note, which is what you are fingering and are hearing. Play a C and the tuner will display a D#/Eb; play a C#, tuner will display an E; play a D and the tuner will display an F, etc, etc, etc.

The tuner may be able to transpose for you so that you finger/play a C on your horn it will display how close you are to that C, but you don't tell use what tuner you have. I have two tuners: a Korg CA-10 (I think that's the model) that will not transpose; and a Centerpitch CP1 that will.
 

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Make sure your tuner is set to A=440Hz, Play F# and you should generate concert A (Tuning note for Alto)

Play middle C you should be at Eb/D#

Some setups will be easier than others to get in tune. I use a classical setup before marking my neck cork(Vandoren AL3 & Van Blue 3 reeds). This ensures that I will be very close with other mouthpiece reed combos. Also make sure your reed is sealing properly by conducting a pop test.
 

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Thanks to all of you the the info, But another nubbie question, what is the "pop test"?
It is easier to show it than to explain but I will try. Place the reed and ligature on the mouthpiece just as you would when you are getting ready to play the saxophone. However, do not put the mouthpiece on the sax neck. Instead block the (shank end) end that goes on the neck with the middle of your left palm. Bring the mouthpiece to your mouth and suck the air out. When you stop creating the vacuum, the reed will move away from the tip of the mouthpiece with a popping sound provided there is no leak between the reed and the table (flat part) of the mouthpiece. You can also blow into the mouthpiece and sometimes you can hear air leaking out if there is a gap between the mouthpiece table reed. I am also a beginner and I have been told by several people on this forum that the pop test is not a very reliable test to check for leaks. Sometimes, even if the pop test fails, the reed could still play well.

I hope that helps.

Edit: You should take lessons from a teacher. A teacher is very helpful especially in the beginning.
 

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Here's what you play on an Eb Alto Sax

:treble::line0::space0::line1::space1::line2::line3::space3:


Here's how it's shown on the tuner in concert pitch:

:treble:b:line1::space1::line2:b:space2:b:line3::space3::line4:b:space4:


And that's why it's call an Eb instrument. :bluewink:
 

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Like most, I check my intonation with a tuner. Some of them can be set to indicate in flats rather than sharps, so that when you play your C on alto, it shows Eb rather than D#.

I use a Boss TU-80 Tuner/metronome which was not expensive. It can "transpose" by increasing the pitch of the reading by semitones. So that, on tenor, when I play my C (which is actually concert Bb) it shows C.

Tuners are great for checking intonation and perfect intervals, octaves, fifths etc, but I have found (just as my teacher told me I would) when playing in a saxophone section you need to slightly flatten major thirds and sharpen minor thirds to make the section sound right.

So much to learn:bluewink:
 

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Remember the sax family is a tranposed instrument when manufactured. C note played on alto will sound like Eb (D#) on the tuner.
 
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