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Discussion Starter #1
I don't use Synth Reeds much so .....I know as a general rule you should really not use your cane reeds on more than one MP because it sort of marries itself to the shape of that MP.
So how about Synth Reeds like Legere, Fibercell's or Plasticoated reeds would this hold true for them as well or not?
Also do you break in a Synth reed slowly or just play them?
 

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good question, I just play the synths, There's no break-in I can discern..I been using synths in dry Vegas for awhile. Marrying ? ..well I do switch mpcs and sometimes swap the reeds no prob. Yes I have heard it's good to "marry" if you can.

FWIW PlastiCovers are not a Synth.
 

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I don't use Synth Reeds much so .....I know as a general rule you should really not use your cane reeds on more than one MP because it sort of marries itself to the shape of that MP.
So how about Synth Reeds like Legere, Fibercell's or Plasticoated reeds would this hold true for them as well or not?
Also do you break in a Synth reed slowly or just play them?
The reed is more important than the MPC and depending on the venue I go between a #7 facing TW Datta and a 5* Tonalin but I am using the same reed. I mean, the point is that you should take out the reed anyway and clean it (and the MPC as well), which should remove most residues of husbandry, not to mention that even a reed may like a little bit of diversity :mrgreen:
 

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I don't know who's teaching that thing about leaving the reed on the mouthpiece so it 'bonds' with it. Maybe its what some players do. What has always worked for me is I take the reed off after playing and put it in a Reed Guard which lets it dry straight. When I want to play that reed again, I take it out, moisten it and put it back in. After about a half-hour its ready to play. I might play that reed on any mouthpiece I may be trying or using. I have two mouthpieces I play now with the same reeds and I have one on the way in to try that would probably use the same reeds. The thing with my method is the reed comes out of the Reed Guard straight, like a new reed. This goes on for many plays if the reed is a good one. If it just won't 'come-in' for me, out it goes. The method is so good that a reed will continue to play past the point that you should use it. One thing I look for which is a definite 'trash can' signal is when the reed tip gets 'webbed feet' with the pulp receding between the fibers. You can feel this too and either you have to trash it or trim the tip which has never worked for me except in the direst emergency - like, 'do it or not play'.
 

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I don't know who's teaching that thing about leaving the reed on the mouthpiece so it 'bonds' with it. Maybe its what some players do. What has always worked for me is I take the reed off after playing and put it in a Reed Guard which lets it dry straight. When I want to play that reed again, I take it out, moisten it and put it back in. After about a half-hour its ready to play. I might play that reed on any mouthpiece I may be trying or using. I have two mouthpieces I play now with the same reeds and I have one on the way in to try that would probably use the same reeds. The thing with my method is the reed comes out of the Reed Guard straight, like a new reed. This goes on for many plays if the reed is a good one. If it just won't 'come-in' for me, out it goes. The method is so good that a reed will continue to play past the point that you should use it. One thing I look for which is a definite 'trash can' signal is when the reed tip gets 'webbed feet' with the pulp receding between the fibers. You can feel this too and either you have to trash it or trim the tip which has never worked for me except in the direst emergency - like, 'do it or not play'.
Ditto, not to mention the plaque that builds up on a reed when you don't clean it off after playing. Arguably, it may help against squeaking but it is the opposite of hygienic and makes your reed sound like you are playing through a curtain. In other words, take it out, rinse it gently, put it in a reed guard and sound consistently good regardless of which MPC you are going to use it on. And avoid strep throat ...
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I don't know who's teaching that thing about leaving the reed on the mouthpiece so it 'bonds' with it. Maybe its what some players do. What has always worked for me is I take the reed off after playing and put it in a Reed Guard which lets it dry straight. When I want to play that reed again, I take it out, moisten it and put it back in. After about a half-hour its ready to play. I might play that reed on any mouthpiece I may be trying or using. I have two mouthpieces I play now with the same reeds and I have one on the way in to try that would probably use the same reeds. The thing with my method is the reed comes out of the Reed Guard straight, like a new reed. This goes on for many plays if the reed is a good one. If it just won't 'come-in' for me, out it goes. The method is so good that a reed will continue to play past the point that you should use it. One thing I look for which is a definite 'trash can' signal is when the reed tip gets 'webbed feet' with the pulp receding between the fibers. You can feel this too and either you have to trash it or trim the tip which has never worked for me except in the direst emergency - like, 'do it or not play'.
Thank you for the replies
I hope I didn't imply anything about leaving the reed on the MP after playing. I always take mine off and put it in a case. I was referring to people saying that you should only use that one reed on that one particular Mp because it bends to the curve of the rails etc so its kind of married to that MP.
 

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Use any reed with any mouthpiece at any time. If it sounds good, it is good.
 

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Ive had good reeds warp on a change of mouthpiece. when I change pieces some reeds continue to work and others have to go to the grave yard. We have very big humidity changes here . from dry mornings to wet foggy nights and that can really change a reed for me. Synth is the way to go but I have never found a brand i like and at 30 bucks a pop I don't experiment K
 

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I have had trouble with alto reeds going from a Selmer S80 C* to trying them on a Jody Jazz HR* 5M. Squeaks and such that do not settle. If I try a new Reed in the Jody Jazz, I don't seem to have as much trouble.

Going the other way, reed first on the JJ to the Selmer, does not seem to be a problem. The Selmer is either more forgiving or I am just more familiar with it.

The JJ is a relatively 'new' mouthpiece for me, so there is a learning curve to consider.

Updated: I just spent a good hour re-testing this and the Jody Jazz behaved perfectly while using old reeds previously used on my Selmer MP. So I can only put my previous problems down to either poor reed placement or my embouchure and technique has improved over the last couple of months. So no problem now swapping reeds to different MPs.
 

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I've never even thought about a synth reed warping to accomodate a mouthpiece and then not playing right on another piece. I tend to move them from mp to mp and, although I have my favorite brand for various pieces, I didn't think about it being anything to do with a reed adjusting to an mp and then not playing correctly on another. As with many things musical, now that I have thought about it I may experience the nuanced (bad) alterations caused by having played a synth reed on a dozen different mouthpieces. Or, I can ignore the conjecture. While it sounds plausible with a cane reed, it doesn't make much sense with fiberglass or carbon composites. A cane fly rod can acquire a curve over the decades. I haven't seen that with carbon fiber fishing rods.

Maybe I haven't played the same synth reed for sufficient decades to see whether it will conform to a single mouthpiece. I'm only approaching a single decade on a Hartmann carbon fiber tenor reed. I only got 5 or 6 years out of one Fibracell, but that was because of damage to the reed. Other Fibracells keep going, but Hartman is my favorite. Yes, they are expensive. At $30 a pop, that's still between $1 to $3 a year for a reed. If I remember correctly, I was spending much more than that for cane reeds, not counting the time and frustration.

I have bought a variety of reeds to find what I prefer, so it has cost me even more. I haven't yet found anything that was so bad that I decided to sell it rather than just put it in the drawer. I probably shouldn't sell any, having played these synth reeds on different pieces. It is possible that a more discerning player could determine that the reed has been ruined by conforming to my Link, and Rico, and WWCo, and Penzel-Muller, etc.

Probably the oldest synth tenor reed that I have is a Legere. I suspect it will last my lifetime because I've yet to find a mouthpiece that I like it on. So there was $30 wasted (so far).

Mark
 

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Don't know about synthetics but in my experience a good cane reed tends to be good on all my mouthpieces and bad reeds are bad on all my pieces. I'm not convinced of the reed mouthpiece marriage thing.
 

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My reeds, both young and old, are all unmarried.

They like the single life, playing the field.

Playing is what they’re good at, and what they’re supposed to do.
 

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I don't know who's teaching that thing about leaving the reed on the mouthpiece '.
That would’ve been Lenny Pickett from the book lessons with the Masters. He says something a kin to the reed and the mouthpiece are like an oboe reed. They become one and you should just leave them.
I used to have a lot of problems with warping reeds and this did solve the problem. It wasn’t really gross . You would leave the reed on but I always rinsed off the mouthpiece under the faucet before playing cleaning the inside also. And once a week or so take the reed off quickly ,rinse it off and then put it back on.

This worked fine in California but when I moved to Oregon leaving the reed on ,it would warp sometimes.
i’ve started using cigar humidifier packs in plastic bags with humidity monitors And I now take the reed off like you’re supposed to.
The bass clarinet player Michael Lowenstein has a great video on YouTube on how to do this.
 

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I don't know how you'd ever prevent warping from leaving the reed on the mouthpiece. The only time I have ever had reeds warp was when they were left on the mouthpiece.

I mean...... If it's in a holder it's pressed flat. If it's not then there's nothing stopping it from warping.

This doesn't make sense to me.
 

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Even using a reed guard andndoing everything right reeds have memory. If the facings of two pieces are similiar along with tip size you are fine playing mix and match. If they are significantly different the reed will likely play like crap on one of them. For instance, a reed from a 115 guardalla will likely play like a piece of crap on a seven star link. I play test loads of pieces and sometimes reeds just wont agree with a piece thats a lot different.

Take a reed used to a 7 star and put it on a five and that baby is gonna close up with a breath air.

Sommixingncan be anproblem but there are no absolute rules that say you cant mix a little. Experiment, if it works, it works. If it sucks younwill know why.
 

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Yes once you’ve used a reed on a certain mouthpiece it may be that it won’t work so well on another especially if going from a short curve to a longer one or an open to a closed tip.
But it all depends on the combo of tip and curve length so basically the answer could be yes or no. Try it and see.
 

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Yes once you’ve used a reed on a certain mouthpiece it may be that it won’t work so well on another especially if going from a short curve to a longer one or an open to a closed tip.
But it all depends on the combo of tip and curve length so basically the answer could be yes or no. Try it and see.
I have a few of the new HR vintage Otto link . I was having warping issues going from the 8* to the 8. The 8* is a pretty old mouthpiece and I think the faceing has changed slightly over the years. I don’t understand it but it seems like since I started keeping my reeds at 72% humidity I haven’t had any problems ...........yet 🤞
 
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