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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What type of neck would you recommend for classical playing? My alto came with a G1 and I’m not to happy with it.
 

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Why do you blame the neck? What about the mouthpiece, reeds, horn, and player?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Tell us what is happening your not happy with .
I bought the sax used and the neck is in fairly bad shape. So it’s probably not the G1 but rather its condition. I figured if I have to get a new one anyway, it might as well be one that works well in a classical setup.

The “62” and C1 are very similar, correct? I think those have a narrow bore and focused intonation?
 

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It may be cheaper to just get your neck repaired. But for me, the V1 played a little better in tune than the G1 on alto. I'm not sure there is such a thing as a neck that's good just for classical. Whenever I play classical, jazz, rock, funk, r&b, blues, I don't go switching necks. But I do use a different mouthpiece for classical versus everything else. In my experience the neck has nowhere near as much influence as the mouthpiece and the player.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It may be cheaper to just get your neck repaired. But for me, the V1 played a little better in tune than the G1 on alto. I'm not sure there is such a thing as a neck that's good just for classical. Whenever I play classical, jazz, rock, funk, r&b, blues, I don't go switching necks. But I do use a different mouthpiece for classical versus everything else. In my experience the neck has nowhere near as much influence as the mouthpiece and the player.
Good advice. Thanks.
 

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I recently got a KB Sax alto neck for my Mk VI alto, the Vanguard model in hammered copper. It is capable of producing a nice classical tone.

Musical instrument Reed instrument Wind instrument Clarinet family Wood
 

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alto: 82Zii/Medusa, tenor: Medusa, bari: B-901, sop: sc-990
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The C neck is recommended neck for classical playing. I have all the necks that Yamaha made and that is the one I would use or an actual Mark VI neck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The C neck is recommended neck for classical playing. I have all the necks that Yamaha made and that is the one I would use or an actual Maark VI neck.
How similar is the C1 to the “62” neck? I heard that they were based on same design.
 

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I swapped out the G1 for the V1 on my 875EX alto, and I really like it. That said, I got my degree with the stock G1, so no complaints either way. On the other hand, I didn't notice as much of a difference between the V1 and the stock neck on my 62 tenor.
 
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I bought the sax used and the neck is in fairly bad shape. So it’s probably not the G1 but rather its condition. I figured if I have to get a new one anyway, it might as well be one that works well in a classical setup.

The “62” and C1 are very similar, correct? I think those have a narrow bore and focused intonation?
I have the new 62 neck and the E1 neck both are fine for any style of music its our mouthpiece/reed and concept .
 

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I have the new 62 neck and the E1 neck both are fine for any style of music its our mouthpiece/reed and concept .

I can’t help thinking to all of the people whom for ages (and still to this day) play any kind of genres with the neck the horn first came with and are happy. It is so easy to get caught in the maelstrom of swapping all sorts of things once they are available to you, forever looking for something outside when probably the “ problem” (if there is one at all!) is mostly within.
 

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I can’t help thinking to all of the people whom for ages (and still to this day) play any kind of genres with the neck the horn first came with and are happy. It is so easy to get caught in the maelstrom of swapping all sorts of things once they are available to you, forever looking for something outside when probably the “ problem” (if there is one at all!) is mostly within.
Yes " first world" problem.
 

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Yes " first world" problem.

it is very funny but the definition of worlds had, originally, nothing to do with wealth but with political alliances , the third world countries were all the countries that weren’t allined with the Atlantic pact or the Warsaw pact , so officially Switzerland would have been a third world country





“....

The "Three Worlds" of the Cold War era, AprilAugust 1975
First World: Western Bloc led by the USA, Japan, United Kingdom and their allies
Second World: Eastern Bloc led by the USSR, China, and their allies
Third World: Non-Aligned and neutralcountries
The term "Third World" arose during the Cold War to define countries that remained non-aligned with either NATO or the Warsaw Pact. The United States, Canada, Japan, South Korea, Western European nations and their allies represented the "First World", while the Soviet Union, China, Cuba, Vietnam and their allies represented the "Second World". This terminology provided a way of broadly categorizing the nations of the Earth into three groups based on political and economic divisions. Since the fall of the Soviet Union and the end of the Cold War, the term Third World has decreased in use. It is being replaced with terms such as developing countries, least developed countriesor the Global South. The concept itself has become outdated as it no longer represents the current political or economic state of the world and historically poor countries have transited different income stages.

The Third World was normally seen to include many countries with colonial pasts in Africa, Latin America, Oceania and Asia. It was also sometimes taken as synonymous with countries in the Non-Aligned Movement. In the dependency theory of thinkers like Raúl Prebisch, Walter Rodney, Theotônio dos Santos, and Andre Gunder Frank, the Third World has also been connected to the world-systemic economic division as "periphery" countriesdominated by the countries comprising the economic "core".[1]

Due to the complex history of evolving meanings and contexts, there is no clear or agreed-upon definition of the Third World.[1] Some countries in the Communist Bloc, such as Cuba, were often regarded as "Third World". Because many Third World countries were economically poor and non-industrialized, it became a stereotype to refer to developing countries as "third world countries", yet the "Third World" term is also often taken to include newly industrialized countries like Brazil, China and India now more commonly referred to as part of BRIC. Historically, some European countries were non-aligned and a few of these were and are very prosperous, including Austria, Finland, Ireland, Sweden and Switzerland. "
 

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I bought the sax used and the neck is in fairly bad shape. So it’s probably not the G1 but rather its condition. I figured if I have to get a new one anyway, it might as well be one that works well in a classical setup.

The “62” and C1 are very similar, correct? I think those have a narrow bore and focused intonation?
What exactly is a fairly bad shape? The cork is worn? The tenon is too loose? You have pull-down?

Necks can make a difference but if everything is actually in good shape and fitted, then the most differences are in sopranos where there are often straight and curved necks as part of the default sales package. And a lot of the "difference" is the comfort for the player which indirectly influences the angle of the air stream going into the MPC. Legend has it that straight necks are brighter and curved necks are darker but in the case of an alto none of this applies.

The most important thing about a neck, other than the cork, is that the tenon is fitted correctly to the receiver. It makes a difference in the seal and it also establishes the "mechanical continuity" of the horn, which may not make much of a difference tor the audience but which is very noticeable for the player. If there is a little ding, just live with it, it's mostly cosmetic. If it was really bent to the point where the cross section becomes oval, then it might be time to look for a replacement but Meridianwinds among others are very capable of fixing this kind of damage.

Good luck
 
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