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Thanks for posting these reviews! I really like your sound.
 

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pretty interesting. has anyone ever had the profile tolerance on a mouthpiece? i'm also interested in a reed profile tolerance. does the resurfacer do better? I expect that they do. there should be a point though where the mouthpiece tolerance becomes irrelevant because its so much better than the reed.

Im also interested in mathematical definition or the contours. Is a particular equation being used? it seems like some of the math producing a smooth transition could make a difference. sort of like cams in an engine you dont want it to just look smooth. the curvature change could be calculated to smooth the 3 or fourth derivatives of the function. has anyone tried this?

I have an idea on the curves from aircraft lofting i used building wood strip canoes. it would likely be expensive to objectively test a lot of variations

What about the edges or the face. I read on the holes a small radius on the edge improves the sound. is it like that on a mouthpiece?
 

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There is a lot of information about the specific curves used on mouthpiece facings on Mojo's "Mouthpiece Work" Yahoo group. There are several spreadsheets on that site that have formulas for the facing curves.

There is also the formula that Theo Wanne derived (aka "The Ring"), although the exact coefficients in it are not published. You can google "Theo Wanne" and "The Ring" and find the page.

Most mouthpieces have (or intend to have) a smooth curve, a section of a circle. This is known as a "radial curve" since the radius, and hence the degree of curvature, is the same everywhere.

Many pieces have an "elliptical" facing, in which the degree of curvature increases toward the tip (by a very small amount). Other pieces have a flat spot in the middle of the facing, others have a small bump, both very small. All of these can be considered as slight deviations from a circular curve.

The most important thing about the facing is that it is smooth and even; that is, the same on both sides of the piece. I actually think that if the facing is generally well constructed, you get much more tonal variation by changes to the baffle and chamber than by changes to the facing. There are some general things about facings that make changes to the sound - short facings are brighter than long ones, for example - but you generally get more change by modifying the baffle and chamber, given the facing is smooth and even.
 

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thanks ill look it up.

in the case of the bump or flat, the way it is blended to the radial curve cold be important. if the curvature is a circular segment, or any curve i suppose, at the tip, there would be an angle between the tangent and the top surface.

are most mouthpieces "cast" then "machined" or machined from a block.

All in all it sounds like a lot of variables and choices.
 

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i took my horn in to a repair shop today and the owner repairman talked a little about it. the measuring methods were basically very dependent on skill of the person doing the work. i would think it could be done more acurately but i suspect the cost of a real science project with mouthpieces and a lot of good players would either cost too much to justify, or, how do you get that many really good players to participate? he also showed me different chamber shapes and baffles.

if you could get a good enough study to figure out some "PERFECT" shapes, i think they could be produced with good NC methods and minimal hand work but where do you find a market big enough to justify it. the volume market is probably schools where the students just wouldnt know the difference. We might also looose some individuality of great players. Maybe its better like it is.
 

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It's not about getting a bunch of good players together it's getting them to agree what a "good playing" piece feels/sounds like. Since there is no "perfect" because every player is a little different in what they want- the skill of the refacer comes in listening to the client, what they like/dislike about a piece and being able to modify the piece such that improvement is made in addressing the dislikes with little effect to the characteristics that the customer did like.
 

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I just got my Caravan mp back from Mojo and I am loving it. It not only sounds better but it's much easier to play. It's like I have a new saxophone. Thanks Mojo!
 
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