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Assuming that you're referring to the lines, it simply means that those are the relationships that are supposed to be stressed. Think of the un-stressed sixteenth note as a sort of classical "ghost tone," but don't actually ghost the note.
 

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Can someone who has worked on these etudes explain to me the notation that occurs at the bottom of the very first etude? It is a little unclear. Thank you!
Dear Saxgal 137,
the Caprices No. I, IV, VI, VIII and XXIV are written in the moto perpetuel style (perpetual mtotion: to be played at an uninterupted, continuous uniform speed) The introduction of practcally indispensable breathing-rests must be left to the player -according to his breathing technique, and the speed at which he may be practising - while he must observe the fundamental rules of phrasing and delivery which say that "whole phrases must not be interrupted!" Only at the real close of a phrase, may he be allowed to take breath immediately before a strong beat. The simplest way is to delay taking breath after the strong beat. If, however, it is impossible to do so, the player should simply leave out the note following the strong beat (unless that note forms an inseparable part of the theme or subject) and introduce a rest in its stead. As a rule, it is musically a far lesser fault to omit one or two notes, than to disturb the strict rhthm.
Sigfrid Karg-Elert, in the Autumn of 1929

If you still interest, I release in this month brabd new a CD with all 25 Caprices and sonata for Saxophone solo. Order is possible over
MDG 603 1506-2, Internet: http:/www.mdg.de
 

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Danke schoen, Herr Christian, for your attention and insight. I'll be looking for that CD. My students (esp the tenor and baritone majors) and I have found your Singelee CD quite necessary and enjoyable.

Angel
 

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I have just obtained a copy of Karg-Elert. The caprices obviously are of varying difficulty. Is anyone inclined to suggest a possible sequence (or part of one) for learning them, starting with the easier ones?
 

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I have just obtained a copy of Karg-Elert. The caprices obviously are of varying difficulty. Is anyone inclined to suggest a possible sequence (or part of one) for learning them, starting with the easier ones?
A few good ones to start with that are relatively easier than the others in the book:

V. Giga
XVI. Piccola danza elegiaca
XXI. Studio
II. Valse Languide
X. Cubana
XIII. In modo misolidio
XIV. In modo frigico

Hope this helps!
 

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I have just obtained a copy of Karg-Elert. The caprices obviously are of varying difficulty. Is anyone inclined to suggest a possible sequence (or part of one) for learning them, starting with the easier ones?
Could you please share with me the copy? I have could not find it.
Tks!
Claudio
 

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Could you please share with me the copy? I have could not find it.
Tks!
Claudio
I just checked by performing a google search on " Twenty Five Caprices and and Atonal Sonata sigfrid karg-elert ", and found many places that have it for sale.

FWIW, it's not cool to share copies of music that are in print and under copyright.
 
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