Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 20 of 148 Posts

·
Distinguished Member
Joined
·
1,003 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Thought I'd start a new thread on this.

I'm looking at buying a small office container to make a practice room for my garden.
Specifically, I'm looking at this one:

From checking with the company the walls should be 30 mm PUR minimum. They can't tell me exactly what this used one might have. The owner says it's very well isolated as it was used for NATO in Brussels.
I realize their idea of well isolated and what would be necessary for practice are two different things.

But initial assessment, does this seem like something that would be enough for me to get away with practicing in my backyard? Would it likely need a little acoustic treatment, or would you suspect I'd have to build a room in a room?
Just talking about noise going out and annoying neighbors for now, not treatment for sound inside.

The other option is to get a cheap shed, which might be less of an eye sore honestly, and spend that money on a serious room in a room concept.

Any thoughts or suggestions are very welcome.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Coffee Guru
Joined
·
39,512 Posts
John, this is very nice for people seeking to work outside and the isolation may very well be for thermal purposes but it isn’t something that I’d consider a “ cheap” nor adequate solution for you problems.

you probably will be better served in the long run from something purpose built although there is no guarantee that you neighbors would not object to any level of noise since not even purpose built


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
127 Posts
The owner says it's very well isolated as it was used for NATO in Brussels.
When local people say "well isolated" they mostly talk about temperature isolation which is something different as noise isolation.

I would guess during winter everything would be OK as doors and windows of the neighbours are closed. But the problem would be more during summer. Will you be able to play in there with the doors closed when it is getting hot outside? I would guess you need to open a door. Or install airco. (which would be ok as the room is very small)

I play in the cellar. My wife thinks I'm crazy as the cellar is the real thing with concrete, bricks and mortar, so it does not look nice. But the temperature is very nice during summer and it keeps the sound inside. And I don't even bother the kids when they are studying for exams.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,758 Posts
It’s a shame that schools or other places with excess capacity don’t allow their rooms or fields to be rented to people for music practice after working-day hours.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,636 Posts
It’s a shame that schools or other places with excess capacity don’t allow their rooms or fields to be rented to people for music practice after working-day hours.
Some times they do! Sort of. I've gotten away with using the practice rooms at local universities many times in the past. What I've found is that there are certain times of the year when those rooms are booked solid, and certain days of the week that are usually busy, but there also plenty of days and times when those rooms are just sitting empty. And if the practice rooms are full, there's usually a nearby parking lot that can be used in a pinch.

As much as I would love to have a soundproof booth to practice in, the price is almost certainly going to be prohibitive. But there are usually other options around.
 

·
Distinguished Member
Joined
·
1,003 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Well, at the moment I'm quite lucky that there is a space on the other side of town where I can practice a bit for free. But, it's only during office hours monday through friday. And it's actually their lunch spot. So it's ok for sort of maintenance work. Keep my chops from giving out completely. But I'm a full time musician (aside from the fact there are zero gigs at the moment). I think it's about time to find a real solution. Then I'll have the freedom, 24/7/365... to be lazy and skip practicing any time I want.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
13,069 Posts
By the time you are done with that you may as well buy a practice booth. They are expensive but you need to figure that that building has close to zero sound stoppage. Glass, metal and a little insulation...may as well find a bridge to practice on.
 

·
Distinguished Member
Joined
·
1,003 Posts
Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
OK, did some research. Not to sound stubborn as everyone here seems to be telling me not to do this... But I'm getting different responses from some other folk.

I'll guy check out the unit today but a rep from the company said, based on anecdotal experience, I can expect the container to have a realistic isolation of 20db.

I did the math, to add 70 mm wood studs, 70 mm of fiberglass, then 2 layers of 5/8 sheet rock divided with green glue... Total for the container plus all that puts me at about 2500. Now, some soundproofing videos I saw said the 2 layers of sheetrock plus green glue alone would give me around 50 db of noise reduction. Plus the 20 db give or take from the unit itself... based on this: (**** maybe that's wrong... trying to find where he says that...)

Seems like it should be fine. Or at least on par with a sound booth on the low end of the range which costs around 4000.
That would be a telephone box type booth. A comparably sized studiobricks unit is 9000.
And, again, I'd still need to build a shed to put it in.

So, what am I missing?
 

·
Distinguished Member
Joined
·
1,003 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Ah here's the clip at the correct time.

So in fact I see an Esmono drum cabin cheap on classifieds right now. Too cheap, probably I'm too late to get it. But I see Esmono only claims between 30 and 40 db reduction. Wouldn't I still be better off with a construction like I've suggested, then?
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Coffee Guru
Joined
·
39,512 Posts
sound reduction is all a relative, every 3db you half the quantity of sound ,but reaching perfect sound isolation is very expensive, if you need to reduce it to almost inaudible , if you don’t that will be considerbly cheaper, the guy in the video says , good, better, best and the price difference and or work is all changing according to that outcome.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,910 Posts
OK, did some research. Not to sound stubborn as everyone here seems to be telling me not to do this... But I'm getting different responses from some other folk.

I'll guy check out the unit today but a rep from the company said, based on anecdotal experience, I can expect the container to have a realistic isolation of 20db.

I did the math, to add 70 mm wood studs, 70 mm of fiberglass, then 2 layers of 5/8 sheet rock divided with green glue... Total for the container plus all that puts me at about 2500. Now, some soundproofing videos I saw said the 2 layers of sheetrock plus green glue alone would give me around 50 db of noise reduction. Plus the 20 db give or take from the unit itself... based on this: (**** maybe that's wrong... trying to find where he says that...)

Seems like it should be fine. Or at least on par with a sound booth on the low end of the range which costs around 4000.
That would be a telephone box type booth. A comparably sized studiobricks unit is 9000.
And, again, I'd still need to build a shed to put it in.

So, what am I missing?

I just thought if you are building out the inside, it might be cheaper to just build a shed and insulate it properly. At least here in the states, I am pretty sure I could build a small shed with de-coupled double walls insulated with rockwool then a minimum of one layer of sheetrock on inside and t-111 siding and metal roof for $1500. Doors and windows are expensive so I would salvage those used.

If you do it the way you are describing, you may want to look up the "triple leaf effect" in regards to sound isolation.
 

·
Distinguished Member
Joined
·
1,003 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
I just thought if you are building out the inside, it might be cheaper to just build a shed and insulate it properly. At least here in the states, I am pretty sure I could build a small shed with de-coupled double walls insulated with rockwool then a minimum of one layer of sheetrock on inside and t-111 siding and metal roof for $1500. Doors and windows are expensive so I would salvage those used.

If you do it the way you are describing, you may want to look up the "triple leaf effect" in regards to sound isolation.
No it's definitely worth considering. I guess I'm also hesitant as that's a whole new level of DIYing I would need to get ready for. I'm pretty confident I can make some interior walls but a whole structure I'm not sure.
But I'm still open to all possibilities.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
106 Posts
If I understand your situation correctly, you've got a space outside in a yard where you could put a small shed and you were considering putting this office container there. Since that's no longer an option, I would do as pontius suggests:

...I am pretty sure I could build a small shed with de-coupled double walls insulated with rockwool then a minimum of one layer of sheetrock on inside and t-111 siding and metal roof for $1500. Doors and windows are expensive so I would salvage those used.
I think a lot of people get hung up on soundproofing thinking they need to cut out all sound. Depending on where you are, you probably just need to make it good enough so that someone walking by about 10 feet away will hear, but will sort of wondering what that sound is and where it's coming from. That can easily be achieved with a a small shed with de-coupled double walls insulated with rockwool and maybe a second one or two layer wall of sheet rock inside.

You can get as basic or as elaborate as you want, if it's me and I'm on a budget, I'd build the thing and though I'd plan for things like electricity and ventilation and such eventually, I wouldn't get bogged down with it.

Oh and if you don't have any tools, double your budget....
 

·
Distinguished Member
Joined
·
1,003 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
I think a lot of people get hung up on soundproofing thinking they need to cut out all sound. Depending on where you are, you probably just need to make it good enough so that someone walking by about 10 feet away will hear, but will sort of wondering what that sound is and where it's coming from. That can easily be achieved with a a small shed with de-coupled double walls insulated with rockwool and maybe a second one or two layer wall of sheet rock inside.

You can get as basic or as elaborate as you want, if it's me and I'm on a budget, I'd build the thing and though I'd plan for things like electricity and ventilation and such eventually, I wouldn't get bogged down with it.

Oh and if you don't have any tools, double your budget....
Thanks. Yeah, all I want is to keep the neighbors happy. And they're inside a building, 30 feet away...
I guess I should just be sure to make something big enough there's room for extra soundproofing later.
 
1 - 20 of 148 Posts
Top