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Erik,
What kind of mixer do you have? I used to have 3 different Mackie mixers, but I used passive speakers, and had 2,150 watts of power. I never used powered speakers except in my recording studio. I doubt they would have a built in reverb, but ya never know. I guess it depends on the mixer you are using, but it should have phono inputs. My Mackie's all did, and I could set the volume for them with the monitor volume knob. Worked great, and it was the right impedance. If yours has a phono input, that would have the right impedance, and you would need a mini to dual phono plugs which are really cheap. If that is the case, it would free up another XLR mic input if you ever want to plug something into that. Let me know what kind of mixer you have, and I will check it out. I would like to see you end up with the right mic, understand mics and impedance better, not be afraid of phantom power, and do it for a low price point.

The good news is there are a lot of different clip on wired or wireless setups for sax right now. Options are a great thing to have, as is knowledge. You are fortunate to have a mixer with built in effects. Makes life simpler, and sounds like it what you need. Less is more. Happy mic hunting.
 

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I guess what Grumps meant was that a mic stand set-up allows the musician to do impromptu play tests off stage, or to quickly play-test to find the right key, by giving him the freedom to walk away without a clip-on attached to his horn that might otherwise amplify that noise for the audience, or even make it complicated for him to walk away. At my low level of skill, I often have to test the key like that before playing.

In fact, I used to attach the key to the title of the soundtrack, when I was playing tenor and soprano alone, but when I started playing alto, I debated whether just to use "concert key" in the title, requiring me to go back and re-name about 500 mp3 files (and their respective folders), or whether to lengthen the title by typing something like, "Tenor F, Alto C" on each mp3 file.

Sometimes I have a soundtrack that I loaded in a hurry, that has no key listed at all, or else concert key, if downloaded from the Internet. So, when I am in a hurry to find a song, and I see the key, I like to double-check off mic, to make sure that it is the key that I think it is.

Eventually I will re-title all soundtracks to include concert key only, but for the moment, as I get new ones, I write it like this: "Rock Around the Clock (PartyTyme Tenor B, Alto F#).mp3" That instantly tells me the source, and the key for each instrument, and then I write that file name onto the score, as well, always in the same left corner of the page, so that I can check the one against the other, before playing. But I still have a hundred scores and soundtracks that are not yet labeled correctly (and another hundred folders), requiring me to still test the key off mic before playing.

(I keep each mp3 file in a separate folder of the same name, to keep the mp3 player from playing any song in the queue automatically without my permission)

By the way, any suggestions on that issue are also welcome, but I know it's off the subject.
The wired and wireless mics I had by Audio Technica both had a on off switch if my old memory is correct. I know the wireless one did for sure. It sounds like you are doing a solo act playing with mp3 files? The ATM 35 has a 9 volt battery compartment in it, and has an XLR out. You can also run phantom power which is better. Phantom is 48 volts, and all condenser mics require power, be it 9 volt or 48 phantom. From what I read years ago the name phantom pretty much means it will power a condenser mic, but you can also plug in a dynamic mic like your SM57, and it passes harmlessly through it. If you go that route and use a condenser mic, make double sure you mute the channel first, and then power down. It is best to wait 30 seconds for the 48 volt power to dissipate so it will not go BOOM.

Just found this link for the ATM 35, and other Audio Technia clip on mics. Good picture of the mic.TThe foam helps isolate the mic from key noise, and protects it, and clip on it is perfect for sax. It is rubber coated. The power pack also has a high pass filter you can use if you wish. It will roll off frequencies below 160 hz, but I never used it on mine. A cardioid mic like it has has the most feedback rejection of any mic made, and has the same polar pattern as your SM57. I never had a problem with feelback on mine, and the sound was crystal clear and amazing
.https://www.audio-technica.com/en-us/pro35
 

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I guess what Grumps meant was that a mic stand set-up allows the musician to do impromptu play tests off stage, or to quickly play-test to find the right key, by giving him the freedom to walk away without a clip-on attached to his horn that might otherwise amplify that noise for the audience, or even make it complicated for him to walk away. At my low level of skill, I often have to test the key like that before playing.
As numerous posts aren't showing up when I pull up this thread, I can only assume someone on my ignore list may be nipping at my heels for some reason or another. I was just answering Fader's concerns about the ability to mute a clip-on mic to check your horn if need be. My AMT is a small unit that attaches to the bell and needs no belt pack. It has two switches; one for power and one for mute. Mine does tend to make an audible "pop" when you click on the power, which can startle a soundman. For me, the mute switch comes in handy before I click on the power to somewhat diminish this affect. Also if you leave the stage with your horn for some reason (like sneaking out the back door of the club to reenter from behind the audience), you don't want your mic on while in transit.
 

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Discussion Starter #64
Styles. I tried to put that information about my equipment, into my "signature" at the bottom of each of my comments , just so that folks would know my current set-up and limited experience, when offering me solutions to my occasional problems. If you click on the italic text below any of my comment sections, it will expand to show all of my equipment and instruments.

Well, I am in the process of moving, so to speak, and to boot, I just found out that I have to take a long trip in just three weeks, and I'll be gone for two months at that point. I have decided to settle for the second-hand ATM 35 that Styles recommended to me from Reverb, for the time being, to see how that goes, as the best compromise between price, function, reputation, and the issue of having phantom power when not using a mixing console to provide it. I don't really have time to try others right now, sad to say, but I am grateful to Fader for offering to let me try several of his. (I went twice to hear him play locally, and it has been lots of fun.)

And, if I had time, and my tools, I would certainly do what Pete recommended.

As it turns out, this ATM35 mic is not really "wireless," but it sounds like it will be a good compromise, without the risks of interference, or whatever other issues truly-wireless mics pose. Otherwise I'll never really know the difference until I start using these things myself. My sincere apologies to those of you who recommended other makes and models, but in the course of time, there is a chance that I may eventually upgrade.

Thanks to all for taking the time to provide such generous information!
 

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Styles. I tried to put that information about my equipment, into my "signature" at the bottom of each of my comments , just so that folks would know my current set-up and limited experience, when offering me solutions to my occasional problems. If you click on the italic text below any of my comment sections, it will expand to show all of my equipment and instruments.

Well, I am in the process of moving, so to speak, and to boot, I just found out that I have to take a long trip in just three weeks, and I'll be gone for two months at that point. I have decided to settle for the second-hand ATM 35 that Styles recommended to me from Reverb, for the time being, to see how that goes, as the best compromise between price, function, reputation, and the issue of having phantom power when not using a mixing console to provide it. I don't really have time to try others right now, sad to say, but I am grateful to Fader for offering to let me try several of his. (I went twice to hear him play locally, and it has been lots of fun.)

And, if I had time, and my tools, I would certainly do what Pete recommended.

As it turns out, this ATM35 mic is not really "wireless," but it sounds like it will be a good compromise, without the risks of interference, or whatever other issues truly-wireless mics pose. Otherwise I'll never really know the difference until I start using these things myself. My sincere apologies to those of you who recommended other makes and models, but in the course of time, there is a chance that I may eventually upgrade.

Thanks to all for taking the time to provide such generous information!
Erik,
I looked up your mixer, and it has two phono jack inputs, each with a LR. You just need a cord with whatever plug your mp3 has and with 2 phono plugs which will be red and white on the other end to plug into your mixer. That should give you the right inpedence, and you will not need to use an XLR with phanom power. It probably will use the monitor switch to adjust volume if it is like my Mackies. I also have a Yamaha mixer similar to yours, and they are very good powered mixers. If you don't want to do that, you could run the mp3 cord into two 1/4 inch plugs. They are channel 5/6 or 7/8 for both phono or 1/4 inch. I hope that makes sense. You can use the ATM 35 either with 48 volt phantom, or put a 9 volt battery into the power pack where you plug the mic and female XLR.

I think you will love the ATM 35 that is used on REVERB. The cord coming out of the mic is about 20 feet or more. The new ones only have a 6 foot cord, and do not have the power pack like that one does. The mic capsule is exceptional, and is made for sax or trumpet. I think you will like it, and I hope you enjoy it.
102938
 

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Erik,
I believe this is the kind of cable you need to connect your mp3 player to the stereo phono (LR) inputs on your mixer. You will find the inputs below the 1/4 inch inputs for channels 5/6 and 7/8. That will be the correct inpedance, and no phantom power will go to those inputs. Your monitor volume knob will probably control that, but check your owners manual. You may need to push a switch on the mixer, but the manual will tell you that. That is the best and correct way to connect an mp3 player to your mixer. Here is one on Amazon, it is 6 foot, dirt cheap and reliable.
https://www.amazon.com/UGREEN-3-5mm...ywords=phono+plug&qid=1617774840&sr=8-42&th=1

I like your attitude, and am impressed that you have made it this far being self taught. I will give you a quick sax lesson on the house. Not sure if you are doing this, but I am guessing you probably are. Most people without lessons or a good teacher will lift their left thumb off of the thumb rest and raise it to put it on the octave key when using that. If you are doing that, it means a lot of thumb movement that slows you down, and does not make for a smooth transition back and forth. The correct and best way is to always leave your left thumb on the thumb rest, and just roll it up a bit when you use the octave key, and then roll it back down when not using it. It will improve your playing immediately, but give it a week so you are used to it, and always do it that way. You will sound more professional. Good luck sir!
 

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Discussion Starter #67
Hey, Styles. Thank you so much for taking the time to offer some additional explanation. I had to take my father to the hospital in an ambulance yesterday, although he's better now, so I don't have time to read and answer your posts just yet, but I will mark the e-mail reminder as "unread," so that I check it again shortly, and respond. Sorry...
 

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I'm back. Thanks for your patience.

Styles, It's been a few months now, since I've used the powered mixer, so I may be a bit fuzzy.

As for the phono jacks, I've tried plugging directly into them, but I can never get a strong signal, even with full volume on the mp3 player. Consequently, I use them for background music alone, or for recording and playback from a laptop, and for the former, I even have to raise the "high" and "low" EQ knobs to 75%, as I recall. Each set, L-R, has its own channel and volume control at the bottom of the corresponding channel gridlines. I've been using a phono-to-3.5mm splitter cable similar to the one you suggested, for my (recess period) background music (and for laptop recording/playback).

The "monitor" volume control, on the other hand, seems to affect ONLY whatever is plugged into the "monitor" jacks.

On the other hand, the first four channels have pre-amps built in, which boost the signal, and I have been using the mp3 player on one of those, with an adapter-cable, male XLR on one end, male 1/8" on the other, and that gives enough sound that I don't have to turn up the volume too much anywhere.

BUT, now that you've told me that this connection is dangerous for whenever phantom power is enabled, I will try one of the other methods to connect.

By the way, thanks for the photo of the console. It made me go hunt down a bigger and better one, so that I can open it on the computer whenever I have to discuss these connections.
 

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I'm back. Thanks for your patience.

Styles, It's been a few months now, since I've used the powered mixer, so I may be a bit fuzzy.

As for the phono jacks, I've tried plugging directly into them, but I can never get a strong signal, even with full volume on the mp3 player. Consequently, I use them for background music alone, or for recording and playback from a laptop, and for the former, I even have to raise the "high" and "low" EQ knobs to 75%, as I recall. Each set, L-R, has its own channel and volume control at the bottom of the corresponding channel gridlines. I've been using a phono-to-3.5mm splitter cable similar to the one you suggested, for my (recess period) background music (and for laptop recording/playback).

The "monitor" volume control, on the other hand, seems to affect ONLY whatever is plugged into the "monitor" jacks.

On the other hand, the first four channels have pre-amps built in, which boost the signal, and I have been using the mp3 player on one of those, with an adapter-cable, male XLR on one end, male 1/8" on the other, and that gives enough sound that I don't have to turn up the volume too much anywhere.

BUT, now that you've told me that this connection is dangerous for whenever phantom power is enabled, I will try one of the other methods to connect.

By the way, thanks for the photo of the console. It made me go hunt down a bigger and better one, so that I can open it on the computer whenever I have to discuss these connections.
I used Mackie mixers, and I ran a CD player into the phono inputs, controlled it with the monitor level, and I could blow the roof off the place. You mixer is different apparently. If you use a plug that fits your mp3, and has a 1/4 inch on the other end, you can run that into one channel on your pre-amp, you will have use of the the pre-amp level that you need, and phantom will only run through the XLR inputs. Phantom never goes through 1/4 inch inputs because you would never need it for that. Then again, you can do what you have been doing since that works, leave the phantom off, and just use the 9 volt batter in the power pack that comes with the ATM-35. Just remember to turn the power off on the power pack when you take a break, and at the end of the gig. If you don't you battery will be dead. Always carry several extra 9 volt batteries with you, and you will be just fine. Options are a good thing. Enjoy your new mic, it is a great one.
 

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Erik,
I just looked up the owner's manual online, and the LR phono plugs are the correct way to connect it. You also need to turn the STEREO INPUT knob fully colockwise. See if that does the trick.
103117
 

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Discussion Starter #72 (Edited)
Well, thank you for taking the time to check. Maybe I need to lower the mic volume so that my master volume can be at 3/4, as you say. Until now, I think I've had it at the 1 o'clock position, and the mic volume has been higher, to compensate. I'll send you a snapshot of my typical layout.

1-2: I've been using the first two channels for my mic, to make a quick switch from soprano to tenor with EQ previously set.
3: This is my cell phone accomp plugged in through an XLR adapter cord.
4: A spare (green) mic for the host to make announcements without disturbing my arrangement on other channels. (Provided only when the host is too dumb to take along his own mic, and thinks it's my responsibility somehow)
Master volume is OFF in this photo
Two wired Mackie Thump speakers are connected to the STEREO OUT XLR jacks.
Headphones are connected to the headphone jack, only for rehearsing at home and hearing my own live performance blended in with the accomp.
Monitor jacks: split-cable joins LR channels into one, that goes into a cheap, 50w monitor.
STEREO OUT: I think I was using these to lines to record into the laptop when this picture was taken one year ago.
Phono jacks 7/8: for recording into a laptop, I think.
8/9: I mistakenly told you that I was using the phono jacks for background music, but apparently I was using the LINE input (mono) channel
 

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Well, thank you for taking the time to check. Maybe I need to lower the mic volume so that my master volume can be at 3/4, as you say. Until now, I think I've had it at the 1 o'clock position, and the mic volume has been higher, to compensate. I'll send you a snapshot of my typical layout.

1-2: I've been using the first two channels for my mic, to make a quick switch from soprano to tenor with EQ previously set.
3: This is my cell phone accomp plugged in through an XLR adapter cord.
4: A spare (green) mic for the host to make announcements without disturbing my arrangement on other channels. (Provided only when the host is too dumb to take along his own mic, and thinks it's my responsibility somehow)
Master volume is OFF in this photo
Two wired Mackie Thump speakers are connected to the STEREO OUT XLR jacks.
Headphones are connected to the headphone jack, only for rehearsing at home and hearing my own live performance blended in with the accomp.
Monitor jacks: split-cable joins LR channels into one, that goes into a cheap, 50w monitor.
STEREO OUT: I think I was using these to lines to record into the laptop when this picture was taken one year ago.
Phono jacks 7/8: for recording into a laptop, I think.
8/9: I mistakenly told you that I was using the phono jacks for background music, but apparently I was using the LINE input (mono) channel
Your picture is different from the owner's manual I found online. You have a MASTER volume knob which of course controls everything. On my Mackie's I usually set it to around 1:00, but it depends on the mixer, amps, and what works. On the bottom right, there is a blue area that says STEREO and MUTE. Make sure MUTE is off so nothing is muted, and crank the stereo knob all the way clockwise. That should regulate the stereo phono jack inputs, and give you a strong signal going into the board. Fool around with it, and see if that does the trick. One caveat I will mention again. If you do use 48 volt Phantom power, make sure you press the MUTE button on the channel the mic cord goes into when you turn things on. When you are ready to turn it off and power down, make sure you MUTE that channel, wait 30 seconds, and then turn your mixer/amp off.
 

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<snip>

But, for my money, the better solution is a DPA 4099S with a Sennheiser or Lectrosonics wireless pack and a short cable from the mic to the transmitter pack.
Absolutely agree about DPA.

BTW, if you're worried about phantom power being applied to your mp3---don't---It won't hurt it. The only concern I've ever had with phantom power is with ribbon mics.
 

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Discussion Starter #76
Sorry to answer late, but thank you, guys.
And sorry to get so off the subject regarding how to use the mixing console. Next time I will send a PM for things like that.

I just received the used ATM35 today, from Reverb.com.
I'm still trying to figure out what those switches are for, on the ATM35 power supply. One position is off, the next has a solid line, and the third has a bent line.
 

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I'm still trying to figure out what those switches are for, on the ATM35 power supply. One position is off, the next has a solid line, and the third has a bent line.
That's your high pass filter, or low end roll off. The bent line is high pass, the straight line is flat, the off is probably off. You'll have to look at the manual to figure out what what the actual frequency is that the high pass starts. Usually it's somewhere around 80Hz. I usually leave the high pass filters off on my mics and deal with it in post if I need to high pass something.
 

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Discussion Starter #78
I see! Thank you so much!
 

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Sorry to answer late, but thank you, guys.
And sorry to get so off the subject regarding how to use the mixing console. Next time I will send a PM for things like that.

I just received the used ATM35 today, from Reverb.com.
I'm still trying to figure out what those switches are for, on the ATM35 power supply. One position is off, the next has a solid line, and the third has a bent line.
That's easy to answer Erik. The straight line means it is on, and the full signal coming through. That is how I always used mine. The bent line means you engage the high pass filter. That means everything below 80 hz will be somewhat rolled off to reduce low frequencies. Some people like it better that way. When you set it to the straight line or bent line, the unit is turned on, and it will accept 48 volt phantom power, or 9 volt battery. Off is self explanatory, and you should switch it there if you are using the 9 volt battery inside, like on a break or the end of the night. It is a good idea to mute the channel the mic is plugged into when you turn the power pack on, and when you turn it off. Prevents it from going THUMP. Experiment attaching the mic to different points on the bell...bottom side, top.
 

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OP - Honestly imo if you aren’t going to go with a clip on for the freedom of a wireless setup and work the crowd I’d probably just stick to the SM 57 you already have. Personally to my admittedly damaged ears I sound best on an RE-20 but never use it in live performances unless I’ll be confined to the stage. :)

So far at home I’m liking the Cloudvocal Prime at home. The clip is really a terrible design though.

This isn’t me but it is a comparison to the DPA 4099

Oops - just saw that you already bought the ATM 35. GL! I’d be curious to see if you like your sound better than your Shure. Having fun with the proximity effect of a stand mic is something you lose with a clip on.
 
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