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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am aware of the traditional resistance shown by most techs and the market about synthetic pads.

When you think of it, despite many attempts to innovate and the clear change in the last 150 or so years of the way pads are made. The saxophone keeps a relationship with its pre-industrial era origins ( from the clarinet and the sarrusophone) beginnings through the use of at least two materials cork and leatherr.

Most attempts to innovate have ben failing (lieke toptone pads)

here is a new type of pad for many wind instruments



“.....About Our Products
Our cross-linked Microcell pad foam offers an even layer of tone hole coverage, which is ideal for clarinet pads, and is manufactured to be:

•100% Impervious To Air

•Highly Water Resistant

•Heat Resistant

•Mold & Bug Resistant

•Installed & Seated With Minimal Heat

•Allows For Solid Key Action Feel

We also offer our Ebony Series products, using another synthetic material, that we feel is perfect for our industry. This solid-black product works great for trumpet top cap and valve stem washers. Because they won’t retain moisture, you can wash trumpet valves and not worry about the washers getting wet. Our washers also have molecular memory, which ensures a longer lasting adjustment for your valve porting. This material is also used in the manufacture of our easy to install Peel–N-Stick water key pads & washers....."






101692
101690
 

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I wonder how those feel under the fingers. Seems like they could be a really good alternative to leather.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
yes, may complain about synthetic pads, but frankly I have had several saxophones padded with Toptone and if they have one thing in common is that they work well eve after years they have ben repadded.

The so called sponginess I have never noticed and the closing noise, may be more than otherwise but it isn’t the end of the world when playing (not just opening and closing with a microphone very highly set to prove a point).

In the NL there is a shop which says they make also an alternative to leather THIS VIDEO v IS NOT ABOUT TRU SEAL

( what you hear , in my opinion is not the pad noise, is play in the key where the leather pad is)


 

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That seems interesting. And sounds better than expected (sounds of the pad closing). Are you going to try them yourself?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
no, but a friend of mine who is into these innovations may
 

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I'm very curious about the ease of installation on the tru-seals. I'm no expert sax tech, I just like to tinker with my project horn when I have some free time, so I'm very much an amateur at leveling pads. Any insight as to whether the tru-seals would be easier to align? I have two opposing thoughts on it (without having ever touched them, so I'm obviously open to being corrected): one, the foam might be more forgiving about not having a 100% level cup, but two, if the pad is set once installed, how does one make adjustments?
 

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Ed Kraus who makes and sells "Omni Pads" for clarinet and oboe is an expert on synthetic pads. In the last discussion I had with him, he stated that the larger toneholes on saxophones makes it more difficult to come up with a material that works and "feels right" to players. This was several years ago, but as far as I know the manufacturers of popular synthetic pads for clarinet are still not marketing synthetics for saxophones, although there are a few being made for bass clarinet which have different toneholes than saxophones.

I have ordered some samples of the True Seal pads from the link provided above, and will report back my impression of them in this thread.
 

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On my soprano sax, the topmost octave pad had a tendency to stick; this persisted through at least two changes of leather pad. Replacing leather with white foam did the trick; it hasn't stuck in years. Granted, it's a tiny tone hole. I have no experience with foam pads on larger tone holes.
 

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On my soprano sax, the topmost octave pad had a tendency to stick; this persisted through at least two changes of leather pad. Replacing leather with white foam did the trick; it hasn't stuck in years. Granted, it's a tiny tone hole. I have no experience with foam pads on larger tone holes.
Dry it after use or use a wedge to keep it open.
 

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The "molecular memory" is a bit tacky but I am pretty sure I know at least some materials that would fit the bill. And unfortunately, I threw out running meters of those instead of experimenting with them. They would probably not have worked anyway but in hindsight, this is so obvious (we were making leak seals for some cryo coolers for computer chips that had to be totally air tight and flexible).
 

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I'm going to have to figure out how to watch this thread. I put Valentino synthetic pads on a soprano clarinet 16(?) years ago and it sits unused on a stand in an upstairs spare bedroom. I walk in and toot on it several times a year. Always perfect. I'm ready for synthetic pads on sax. I just bought a baritone sax (why? Well, I have two baritone mouthpieces just laying around). I'm sure it will get a repad as the original pads are now 74 years old. Synthetic pads sounds great because the baritone will also probably get tooted twice a year.

Mark
 

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On my soprano sax, the topmost octave pad had a tendency to stick; this persisted through at least two changes of leather pad. Replacing leather with white foam did the trick; it hasn't stuck in years. Granted, it's a tiny tone hole. I have no experience with foam pads on larger tone holes.
I had the same problem (on both octave pads) on my soprano, and switching to cork pads worked for me, but I'm sure that synthetics would work just as well. Just about anything that's airtight and has some give should work (e.g., Stephen Howard recommends using Sugru to make octave key pads).

But I think you hit the nail on the head with regard to size. The issues of "feel" and "noise" noise are both pretty insignificant for these pads because they are so small.
 

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Just wondering if anyone has had any experience with pads from Tru-Seal?
I came across them by accident today and thought they sounded interesting.
 

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No user experience in it, but there was already a thread started on these: Tru Seal synthetic pads
Thanks.
I did see this thread but it didn’t really provide any insight.
Those who were going to order sample pads and report back, didn’t do so.
However unless a full instrument is re padded using these synthetic pads, it’s probably not going to give any real indication of how they perform.
I may take a chance on them if I can pick up a cheap restoration project horn in the near future.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
perhaps continuing my thread would have been producing more results exactly from the people that you are mentioning
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 · (Edited)
or even respond to a new thread, I see the threads have been merged now, @saxoclese and @JayeLID who hve ordered a sample may be answering the query
 
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