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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,
i would like to find players who have practiced some of the methods that Lennie Tristano used with his students. Specially i am more interested in the SLOW IMPROVISATION exercise where you have to improvise on a tune on a very slow pace but playing like you would play at real speed. For example you solo on a tune using quarter note at 60-80 bpm. You play mostly eight notes like you would do playing at 200 bpm, for example (of course, larger value notes are ok too). You record and then speed the recording and hear the results.
I have begin this practice with the standard "It could happen to you" and have found interesting things. I used Ireal bass only and myself on alto. As this lets you time to HEAR more and also THINK, you can try things that you would normally do but come from you, instead of the more boxed kind of improvisation(not to dismiss anything). Of course you can also play licks but the focus is more on being creative, as far as i understand.
Then there are other interesting exercises, like the meter studies, and the harmony expansions...

Have anyone practice this?

We can share our experiences and help each other.
I could try to share my first recordings in the slow improvisation thing if you are interested.

Best wishes to all!
 

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I bought this book a while ago, is about Warne Marsh, and explains these exercises among others:

https://www.johnklopotowski.com/book-preview#twofourtriplets

It seems the whole book is there for free, so there you have some explanations of the exercises.
What an interesting read that is. The author had contacted me years ago about it and I read it back then. It is so great to read through it again. So much stuff in there to take in and understand. Wow!
 

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Hello,
i would like to find players who have practiced some of the methods that Lennie Tristano used with his students. Specially i am more interested in the SLOW IMPROVISATION exercise where you have to improvise on a tune on a very slow pace but playing like you would play at real speed. For example you solo on a tune using quarter note at 60-80 bpm. You play mostly eight notes like you would do playing at 200 bpm, for example (of course, larger value notes are ok too). You record and then speed the recording and hear the results.
I have begin this practice with the standard "It could happen to you" and have found interesting things. I used Ireal bass only and myself on alto. As this lets you time to HEAR more and also THINK, you can try things that you would normally do but come from you, instead of the more boxed kind of improvisation(not to dismiss anything). Of course you can also play licks but the focus is more on being creative, as far as i understand.
Then there are other interesting exercises, like the meter studies, and the harmony expansions...

Have anyone practice this?

We can share our experiences and help each other.
I could try to share my first recordings in the slow improvisation thing if you are interested.

Best wishes to all!
I studied with Sal Mosca, a Lennie Tristano student for over ten years. You should look him up on YouTube, devastating piano player. Very arduous course of study but worth it. Also look up Jimmy Halperin. Jimmy studied with Tristano, Marsh, and Sal. I don’t teach but Jimmy might. Message me and I’ll send you Jimmy’s phone number. He’s even better than Warne. Phil Barone
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks Nefertiti. Yes that book has a some useful information, the best i have found regarding specific exercises. I wonder if the Shim Tristano book has explanations of the method too.

Thanks Phil for the suggestion, a quick search and found this very nice tune, very tristanoish too.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W0LvKY1mr-Q&frags=pl,wn

I am located in Spain, does Jim have an email? I didn't plan to take lessons( little time and less money incomes) but maybe is not a bad idea to better use and understand the method, at least at the beginning.
 

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thank you for pointing me to this (for me) unknown and interesting world!!!
 

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thank you for pointing me to this (for me) unknown and interesting world!!!
The Tristano disciples, Warne Marsh, Lee Konitz, Sal Mosca and all of their students were highly underrated. It’s a little esoteric and it’s definitely very difficult stuff to play but it’s truly unique. There’s not a lot of expression going on so you really have to pay attention to it but it’ll blow your mind. Sal and Lennie had an awful lot of students but unfortunately there’s not many people who want to listen to such intellectual and introverted music, even among musicians. Lennie played with Bird by the way on 52nd St. They are all remarkable players. My lessons with Sal were always at midnight and he charged me twenty dollars for the whole ten years I studied with him. The only thing he cared about was music, not even playing out. I think he did three concerts in fifteen years. Phil Barone
 

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https://www.johnklopotowski.com/book-preview#twofourtriplets

It seems the whole book is there for free, so there you have some explanations of the exercises.
Thanks for the links, it's awesome!

Specially i am more interested in the SLOW IMPROVISATION exercise where you have to improvise on a tune on a very slow pace but playing like you would play at real speed. !
It turns out that this is only part of the work; the other part is transcription of itself.
 

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Thanks for the links, it's awesome!


It turns out that this is only part of the work; the other part is transcription of itself.
Heyy!!! yes, i think i skipped something!! Thanks, that seems to be the next logical thing to do. Very interesting because, in a way, i am the generator on my own language!!
 

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Very interesting because, in a way, i am the generator on my own language!!
I think I understood the meaning of a very slow improvisation: at this rate, nervousness is almost completely removed, sounds come out freely and melodic intonation without distortion under the influence of nervousness. Perhaps intensive work on improvisation contributed to my habit of deforming familiar words and creating new ones based on a few words.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I think I understood the meaning of a very slow improvisation: at this rate, nervousness is almost completely removed, sounds come out freely and melodic intonation without distortion under the influence of nervousness. Perhaps intensive work on improvisation contributed to my habit of deforming familiar words and creating new ones based on a few words.
I agree. Also there's an improvising attitude involved in the slow exercise that i want to keep when going real speed, this reduces the amount of relearned licks that you throw when playing, specially when i want to play eight note lines.
 
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