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Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone, Im trying to understand exactly the relationship between different instruments and where they sit in relation to each other. Can anyone help us fill in the chart below. Im using c in the treble clef C5 as the piano reference point and then pressing c on each instrument and trying to work out or corrolate its position on the piano, have I got the clarinets right, I have no idea yet really where the saxes sit but would appreciate any feedback
Thanks Steve

C
B
A#/Bb
A
G#/Ab
G
Gb/F#
F
E
D#/Eb
D
Db/C#
C (C5 Treble clef C) Piano, C melody Sax, C Clarinet, Flute, Guitar,
B
A#/Bb Bb Clarinet
A A Clarinet
G#/Ab
G
Gb/F#
F
E
D#/Eb
D
Db/C#
C (C4 Middle C)
B
A#/Bb Bb Bass Clarinet
A
G#/Ab
G
Gb/F#
F
E
D#/Eb
D
Db/C#
C
B
A#/Bb Bb Contra Bass Clarinet
A
G#/Ab
G
Gb/F#
F
E
D#/Eb
D
Db/C#
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member
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3,875 Posts
That gets kind of subjective. Not in where the ranges of different instruments relate to one another, but relating them to specific notes on the keyboard.

What C did you choose? Why? Why is this C better than another C?

You wrote piano beside C5. Why wouldn't you put it at C4 (middle C)?

Anyway, whatever C you use:
Soprano sax would be the Bb below it (same as clarinet or trumpet).

Alto would be at the Eb below that.

C melody would be the C below that, an octave below the reference pitch. Guitar sounds an octave lower than piano when playing the same written music so it would go here too.

Tenor would go the Bb below that, same as bass clarinet.

And Bari would go the Eb below that. An octave and major 6th below whatever C you're using as reference.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks mate, no reason why I chose the middle treble clef c just used that as a ref point to start with I had no idea how it goes, so using your info Ill put this into the equation. Your helps appreciated, anyone got some more to offer as well
 

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simso said:
Thanks mate, no reason why I chose the middle treble clef c just used that as a ref point to start with I had no idea how it goes, so using your info Ill put this into the equation. Your helps appreciated, anyone got some more to offer as well
It might be easier to think:

Any C on the piano is a D on clarinet/trumpet/soprano and tenor sax

Any C on the piano is an A on the alto and baritone saxes

or

Any Bb on the piano is a C on clarinet/trumpet/soprano and tenor sax

Any Eb on the piano is an C on the alto and baritone saxes

Confusing, isn't it? :)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks keith, I understand that bit but here comes the dilemma


Any Bb on the piano is a C on clarinet/trumpet/soprano and tenor sax

" is the Bb above or below the piano c is it in the same octave or is it in a different octave"

Any Eb on the piano is an C on the alto and baritone saxes

"same again"

Im trying to explain it and organise examples for my kids, but if I cant even define them then how can I possibly explain it
Steve
 

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simso said:
Any Bb on the piano is a C on clarinet/trumpet/soprano and tenor sax

" is the Bb above or below the piano c is it in the same octave or is it in a different octave"

Any Eb on the piano is an C on the alto and baritone saxes

"same again"
A trumpet/clarinet/soprano is pitched a major 2nd below concert pitch. Therefore, if you want to write a concert C4 for one of these instruments, you need to write it a major 2nd UP. Thus C4 :line0: for piano becomes D :space0: for soprano.

A tenor is an octave below those instruments but is in the same key. It is pitched a major 9th below concert pitch. So it too plays a D but needs to add an octave in order to play the D in the correct octave :line4:. If you want to transpose concert pitch to tenor (or bass clarinet), you need to write it up a major 9th (octave + major 2nd).

An alto is pitched a major 6th below concert pitch so you need to transpose the concert music up a major 6th. For C :line0: that would be an A:space2: .

For Bari, you do the same thing but add an octave :line6: . You transpose concert pitch up a major 13th (octave + major 6th).

The lower an instrument is pitched, the higher you have to write the note for that instrument to get the same sounding pitch.
For sounding middle C4
:space0: - Soprano
:space2: - Alto
:line4: - Tenor
:line6: - Bari

If you wanted to transpose sax music to concert pitch, you would do the opposite and move everything down whatever interval (M2, M6, M9, M13) you have to depending on the instrument.
 
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