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Discussion Starter #1
Hey all,

There are two songs which we have to play in medley for our prayer meeting this week: “I was made to Praise You” (Chris Christensen) and “I just want to Praise You” (Arthur Tannours).

The first is in the Key of G but will be played and sung in Key of F (both songs will be played and sung in F). I have transposed this to Eb without any problem.

The second is in the Key of E. Please excuse my ignorance but I’m not sure how to transpose this to Eb so that both songs will be in tune for the alto sax.

Any help will be appreciated.

Thanks and God bless!

Ben
 

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Ben
if the song is in E concert, it becomes C# or Db on the sax (not an easy key if it is in Major).
If the song is in Em concert, C#m on the sax is not too hard to handle I'd say (4#).
If the song is in E Major concert, I'd suggest that it be sung a half step higher, ie in F concert for the choir like your other tune, which would mean D for you. Since it is a medley it would stay in the same key.

Good luck
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Ah Cheung. (Now I know it's not me) I believe its in E Major Concert but I have to double check. Will try your recommendations.
God bless!
Ben
 

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Discussion Starter #5
danarsenault said:
Welcome to worship sax. Most modern worship tunes are in 'guitar' keys. like G, D, A, and E concert (E, B, F#, and C# on alto). Aren't you glad you practiced all your sharp key scales?
You bet! During last Friday's practice the lead guitarist (and choirmaster) and the keyboard player can't make up their minds whether another song sounded better in C or F. They kept switching from one to the other. The vocalists don't seem to mind although they had to sing the same song twice (once for each Key).
The other instrumentalist (second guitar, bass guitar, electric guitar) didn't mind either.
Really pissed me off but I held my peace. After all I'm low on the food chain.:(
Thanks and God bless!
Ben
 

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If you are playing two songs in F, the target key, for both of these songs will put you in the key signature of D for both songs.

When we say that an instrument is a Bb or Eb instrument, what we mean is that when the Bb instrument plays a Bb and an Eb instrument plays an Eb, in reality they are sounding a Concert C.

Your Eb alto is a minor third above the Concert C. So to get to the Concert Key you have to write is a minor third down to match the concert Key.

Such as

C=A
Bb=G
A=F#
Ab=F
G=E
Gb/F#=Eb/D#
F=D
E=C#
Eb=C
D=B
Db/C#=Bb/A#

That is if you are just playing off the sheet in the Key it is written.

However, neither of these song are written in F. This first song is one step above a concert F ( in Concert G) and the second song is a half step below the Concert F in Concert E.

If they were playing “I Was Made To Praise You,” in G, the Key it is written, then you would just play it in E. But since they are playing it in F. You need to go from G to D, since they are playing it in F, you need to transpose from G to D, which is a fourth down. D being your target key.

G=D: Gb/A#=C#/Db: F=C: etc.

If they were playing “I Just Want To Praise You,” in the key it was written, you would be in the Key of C#. But they are not, they are going up a half a step. Again, if the group is playing in F, you need to play in D. But the music is written in E. Then we go from E to D, which is down a full step, so that you are a reading a minor third below the key they are playing in..

E=D: Eb or D#= Db/C#; D=C: C#/Db=B:, etc.

Whenever they play in the Key of F, you play in the Key of D. This is why they are going a full step down (first song) and a half of step up in the second and you are going a fourth down in the first song and a full step down in the second, to keep a minor third below them. They are going to F and you are going to D.


If you are using a chart and have chords, just lower the note as indicated above and keep the chord structure the same. (maj7, sus, min7, etc.)

The first is in the Key of G but will be played and sung in Key of F (both songs will be played and sung in F). I have transposed this to Eb without any problem.
If you have transposed it down to Eb, you need to go down another half-step to D, since they are playing in F.

It’s a lot work, and they don’t understand. Write it out beforehand if you have the music with you. After all is said and done, they wind up with one flat and you wind up with two sharps. Not a bad deal.

This would confuse most mortal musicians, but then we are saxophone players. The more you do it, the easier it gets.

Peace,

Chris.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Straightsax said:
If you are playing two songs in F, the target key, for both of these songs will put you in the key signature of D for both songs.

When we say that an instrument is a Bb or Eb instrument, what we mean is that when the Bb instrument plays a Bb and an Eb instrument plays an Eb, in reality they are sounding a Concert C.

Your Eb alto is a minor third above the Concert C. So to get to the Concert Key you have to write is a minor third down to match the concert Key.

Such as

C=A
Bb=G
A=F#
Ab=F
G=E
Gb/F#=Eb/D#
F=D
E=C#
Eb=C
D=B
Db/C#=Bb/A#

That is if you are just playing off the sheet in the Key it is written.

However, neither of these song are written in F. This first song is one step above a concert F ( in Concert G) and the second song is a half step below the Concert F in Concert E.

If they were playing “I Was Made To Praise You,” in G, the Key it is written, then you would just play it in E. But since they are playing it in F. You need to go from G to D, since they are playing it in F, you need to transpose from G to D, which is a fourth down. D being your target key.

G=D: Gb/A#=C#/Db: F=C: etc.

If they were playing “I Just Want To Praise You,” in the key it was written, you would be in the Key of C#. But they are not, they are going up a half a step. Again, if the group is playing in F, you need to play in D. But the music is written in E. Then we go from E to D, which is down a full step, so that you are a reading a minor third below the key they are playing in..

E=D: Eb or D#= Db/C#; D=C: C#/Db=B:, etc.

Whenever they play in the Key of F, you play in the Key of D. This is why they are going a full step down (first song) and a half of step up in the second and you are going a fourth down in the first song and a full step down in the second, to keep a minor third below them. They are going to F and you are going to D.


If you are using a chart and have chords, just lower the note as indicated above and keep the chord structure the same. (maj7, sus, min7, etc.)



If you have transposed it down to Eb, you need to go down another half-step to D, since they are playing in F.

It’s a lot work, and they don’t understand. Write it out beforehand if you have the music with you. After all is said and done, they wind up with one flat and you wind up with two sharps. Not a bad deal.

This would confuse most mortal musicians, but then we are saxophone players. The more you do it, the easier it gets.

Peace,

Chris.
Wow! Thanks Chris. I think this is exactly what I need. I was trying to figure this out but you just did it for me. Saves a lot time. I'll print this out and use it as guide.
Really appreciate it.
God bless!
Ben
 

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Dan,

Oh yeah, somehow I keep leaving my saxophone capo at home. With soprano there is not as many E=C# worries as with the alto, just up to F#. It's amazing how good one can get in F#. Guess you have C# down to a tee.
 

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Ben,

There's a transposition chart on SOTW. Check out the main page. I finally, broke down a bought Sibelius, a notation program that changes the key with click of a button.

The guitars will have favorite keys, once you transpose your first song, doing it the second time is a lot easier. After a while you have it down and know where they are going. It's a learning curve, but we only have to learn it once. Then, it does get easier, after a while you will be able to do it in your sleep.

Good luck, and anytime.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Chris,
:D C#??!! Not to a tee yet but almost there. I've forced myself to memorize all major scales but don't use F often enough I guess. Plus I'm still new to this transcribing thing (I've only been playing sax for three years).
Oh yeah, I have the song sheets (with notes and chords) which helps a lot. I also tape the choir during the practice so when it becomes too complicated to figure out I rely on the tape recorder as a last resort.

Thanks again.

Ben
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Straightsax said:
Ben,

There's a transposition chart on SOTW. Check out the main page. I finally, broke down a bought Sibelius, a notation program that changes the key with click of a button.

The guitars will have favorite keys, once you transpose your first song, doing it the second time is a lot easier. After a while you have it down and know where they are going. It's a learning curve, but we only have to learn it once. Then, it does get easier, after a while you will be able to do it in your sleep.

Good luck, and anytime.
Yes, I've checked out the chart. As for doing it in my sleep, that's my goal (eventually). God bless!

Ben
 
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