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I bought a Bb marching French horn and downloaded fingerings for it. I also have a single F French horn. When I play my F horn using the fingerings for the Bb horn, I get concert notes on my tuner. I am not smart enough to understand this. Can you help? Laughing is okay.
 

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You should always get concert pitch on your tuner unless it has settings for various-pitched instruments. I guess you're saying if you play a 'B' on your horn, you're getting a 'B' concert? That would mean whatever clef the F horn is in corresponds to being keyed in 'C'.
 

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I bought a Bb marching French horn and downloaded fingerings for it. I also have a single F French horn. When I play my F horn using the fingerings for the Bb horn, I get concert notes on my tuner. I am not smart enough to understand this. Can you help? Laughing is okay.
This is probably not going to help, but it's as "layman" as I can get it.
First note is that your Bb marching horn is essentially the same as a Bb single horn. You will find a lot more information on this subject if you read up about double horns.

When you play a written "C" on your F horn, it sounds the concert F below it. I.e. your "middle c" sounds the F in the middle of the bass clef.

The Bb side of the french horn stays written as if it was an F horn and you use different fingerings. This is comparable to tuba plays that only see concert pitch music whether they are playing BBb, CC, Eb, or F tubas and have to use different fingerings for all of them. A written Bb on the second line of the bass clef is open on a BBb tuba and sounds a concert Bb, but on a CC tuba you have to depress first valve. On Eb it is also open, and on F it is also first valve. Even though the BBb and Eb, and CC and F tubas are using the same fingering, they are actually playing in a different partial, similar to the C in the middle of the staff for a french horn where it is open on both the F and Bb sides, but you are playing in a different partial for each.

So what does this mean for your experience with the horn becoming a "nontransposing instrument". You are likely not playing in the right partial. The fingerings would essentially cancel out the transposition, but it is likely you're playing in the wrong partial.

Something similar is not terribly uncommon in pit work and I actually had a concert the other week that I had to transpose in a similar fashion. I was playing bari sax *Eb*, and was reading a bass clarinet part *Bb*, note the transposition is playing an instrument that is a perfect fifth higher than the reading instrument *same as playing Bb while reading F*, and I used the bass clarinet fingerings on the bari sax in order to read the part. I.e. when a C was written, I fingered it as a G on the bari sax. It's also not terribly uncommon for bass sax players to transpose tuba parts with a different fingering system though that one is a quite a bit more difficult since you are also reading in bass clef. That takes quite a bit of practice
 
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