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Discussion Starter #1
I am understood from concert C4 (middle C on piano) is A4 (left hand 1, 2 fingers) on the Alto sax, but I got a road block right now. Here is the original notes on the sheet music:
F# and the meter is 4/4
First measure: B4(1/8) C5(1/16) B4(1/16) B4(1/8) G4(1/8) E4(1/8) G4(1/8)
Next measure: B3(whole note).

Here is my transposing:
C# F# G# D# meter: 4/4
First measure: G4 A4 G4 G4 E4 C4 E4
Next measure: G3
Our Alto playing range is from B3. So I cannot play G3 at all on the alto.
What did I do wrong? Please help.
Thanks,
 

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You should be up an octave for the whole transposition. If C4 goes to A4, B4 goes to G#5, not G#4.
 

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Steve Keller is right, so I'll just add an explanation: If you need it to sound like it's set, you'll have to transpose one major sixth up instead of one minor third down, and that'll also do the trick to position the whole line in playable pitch, at least for now (the alto sounds lower, not higher than noted - but what you did is a pretty common misconception, mostly because it appears to be easier that way, especially when sightreading and transposing in one go).

You've got the scale right (Emaj), so it's only a matter of putting it all up one octave from what you have right now (which means that your first note should be G(#)5, like Steve indicated). This'll put the whole note to G(#)4 - comfortable.

M.

N.B. It's tough to think in English system note names - I've just about mastered the German system...
 

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Up a major 6th. You cn get there by going down a minor 3rd then up an octave.
Yes, down a minor 3rd and then up an octave is easiest for me. However, I find that I have some difficulty at speed since I don't it enough to be really comfortable with it. When playing along with a singer who uses the "Low Vocal" Real Book, I shift from tenor to alto, and if I'm not real focused.....
 

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Takes time and experience to get good at doing it.
Played a gig years ago (we read charts out of a thick book) that required both alto and tenor, once I got to the bored stage on the gig, I started playing the alto parts on tenor and tenor parts on alto to amuse myself, of course, needing to transpose the whole time. Got good at it after a while. So considering I'm good a transposing down a -3rd(for alto), and up a whole step (for tenor), I'm therefore also good at transposing major 6ths and -7ths (the inverse of -3rds and 2nds), 4ths (playing tenor on alto parts), its inverse of 5ths. Half steps are always kind of easy. So my weakest transposing are major 3rds (therefore -6ths) and tri-tones.
Anyhoo ... no shortcuts or secrets ... just do it alot.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thank you very much.
I got it now. Will it also work if I look at the piano key, then I just count 10 keys up from the one I transposing to?
 

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Thank you very much.
I got it now. Will it also work if I look at the piano key, then I just count 10 keys up from the one I transposing to?
New player - do you know your major triads? If you do, then you don't have to do all that counting.

Just think of the triad of whatever note you are transposing from, and then add a major second (M2nd) (two half-steps).
In other words: Piano note + triad + M2nd = transposed note.

1st note is a C: think C-E-G add A and there you are. C = transposed A.
From Bb: Bb-D-F + G. Bb = G.
From Db: Db-F-Ab + Bb. Db = Bb.
etc.
 
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