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Yes, very nice! Quite amazing to see how it was done in 1911. Thank you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The longer I look at the photos the easier it is to imagine the whole scope of the operation and what it was really like. These are the people who built the horns that are still in use today and among the best ever made. I wounder how much it changed from that period to the 20's and 30's when the very best Conn's were produced.
 

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What really strikes me, apart from the obvious awesomeness of that many people working at making wonderful, beautiful instruments, is how far we've come in terms of health & safety. All those exposed drive belts & wheels, presses with no guards, etc...yikes! Wonder what the industrial accident rates were like back in those days...
 

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No on in these pics are smiling. It must have been a pretty bad job. It appears women were not allowed to make instruments and men were not allowed to make instrument cases.


Thanks for the post
 

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Fascinating shots. Thanks for posting!
 

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This is great! I saw another site with a project like this (or maybe this one, ha) several years ago. Its a great inside look at 'how it were'
 

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C-Tenors! Yay!

Circled in red.

Table Furniture Building Art Recreation


All credit to Daniel Oberloh, and Oberloh Woodwind and Brass Works.
 

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No on in these pics are smiling. It must have been a pretty bad job.
People 100 years ago didn't generally think "smile!" when a photograph was about to be made. For one thing, they had to be lengthy exposures and you needed to hold still for awhile or you'd blur out (and some of the workers in these shots did).

As to working conditions under Col. Conn's ownership - all I know is this: A metalworkers' union organized the factory sometime early in the century. When Carl Greenleaf bought out Col. Conn in 1915, I believe he made concessions to get rid of the union. The next labor trouble I know of at Conn was the strike of 1947, and that was a bad one.
 

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Dental health being in the sad state that it was way back when, smiling for the camera likely exposed missing teeth or a bad denture job.

Lots to be said back then for keeping one's mouth shut :)
 

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What really strikes me, apart from the obvious awesomeness of that many people working at making wonderful, beautiful instruments, is how far we've come in terms of health & safety. All those exposed drive belts & wheels, presses with no guards, etc...yikes! Wonder what the industrial accident rates were like back in those days...
I don't really think that we've improved much... back then the average worker had a sense of pride and commitment with what they did for a living. Nowadays is just about loggin in the required hours and do as little as possible. No wonder why with all the improvements on technologies and such, we still play on those old horns...
 

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C-Tenors! Yay!

Circled in red.
I've never seen one older than about 1918 - when the play-at-home craze really hit. But they obviously existed!

What else you notice...no straight sopranos. The toolings were ruined in the fire the year before. They didn't make a straight horn again till '22.
 
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