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I'm finding myself playing a metal link RR Super D 7 and Otto link hard rubber NV Slant 5* back and forth. The metal link gives me the dexter sound and I can get a good Ben WEbster vibe. It basically helps emulate the guys that used that set up. The hard rubber link helps channel Getz and Zoot. The hard rubber piece also is easier to play and makes improvising flow easier. But the sound of the RR is closer to the sound on the records. (It has a better core sound). I got both pieces from forum members. The New Vintage Slant I got from Saxydude who sent it over right away (Thanks!). It was my first deal with him. And the RR I got from Les Arbuckle who is my regular go to guy and from whom I have purchased an overhauled Mark VI tenor as well (highly recommend him and check out his album with Kenny Barron).

Back to the topic: The sound concepts of Getz and Dexter are so different but I like them both equally. Both pieces have excellent craftsmanship and play really well (You can tell the RR is higher end though).

Any way has anyone else gone through this? Once I was at Mannys in LA and there was on old cat that complemented me and said, "Well how do you want to play". I said I want to sound like Stan Getz, Dexter Gordon, Joe Henderson...Paul Desmond". He said "Well thats nice as long as you pick some real players". Then Manny made us crack up because he interjected "You cannot sound like all those players" We all started to laugh.

As I left he put on Gene Ammons Boss Tenors and said, "Just listen to Gene".
 

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"You cannot sound like all those players"

He spoke the truth. You need to find the mouthpiece that helps you play like you want to even tho it may not be 'perfect' for any sound but yours.
 

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I'm finding myself playing a metal link RR Super D 7 and Otto link hard rubber NV Slant 5* back and forth. The metal link gives me the dexter sound and I can get a good Ben WEbster vibe. It basically helps emulate the guys that used that set up. The hard rubber link helps channel Getz and Zoot. The hard rubber piece also is easier to play and makes improvising flow easier. But the sound of the RR is closer to the sound on the records. (It has a better core sound). I got both pieces from forum members. The New Vintage Slant I got from Saxydude who sent it over right away (Thanks!). It was my first deal with him. And the RR I got from Les Arbuckle who is my regular go to guy and from whom I have purchased an overhauled Mark VI tenor as well (highly recommend him and check out his album with Kenny Barron).

Back to the topic: The sound concepts of Getz and Dexter are so different but I like them both equally. Both pieces have excellent craftsmanship and play really well (You can tell the RR is higher end though).

Any way has anyone else gone through this? Once I was at Mannys in LA and there was on old cat that complemented me and said, "Well how do you want to play". I said I want to sound like Stan Getz, Dexter Gordon, Joe Henderson...Paul Desmond". He said "Well thats nice as long as you pick some real players". Then Manny made us crack up because he interjected "You cannot sound like all those players" We all started to laugh.

As I left he put on Gene Ammons Boss Tenors and said, "Just listen to Gene".
It sounds like you are doing great at sounding like those other players but at a certain point you have to take all those influences and decide how you want to sound. Part of that has to do with the way you think. Instead of thinking that you want to sound like so and so you should be fighting to sound like "DryMartini". You have to decide what that means.........Ii might mean mixing what you love about Dexter with what you love about Getz and coming up with your own thing.......
 

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It sounds like you are doing great at sounding like those other players but at a certain point you have to take all those influences and decide how you want to sound. Part of that has to do with the way you think. Instead of thinking that you want to sound like so and so you should be fighting to sound like "DryMartini". You have to decide what that means.........Ii might mean mixing what you love about Dexter with what you love about Getz and coming up with your own thing.......
Do people that have a distinctive sound really do that? I mean, try to select it from pieces of other players' sounds?

I think I have a distinctive sound on alto and baritone (not so much on tenor) and in my case I think it's developed into what it is, despite what I might have tried to do. Although to be honest, I have not tried very hard to push it one way or the other.

Don't you think that people with a very distinctive sound, just let it develop and there it was, rather than trying to sound like this guy or that guy or this part of that guy added to that part of this guy?

I mean, you're always going to pick up some things from anyone you listen to a lot. But it seems to me that the way to develop a sound is to spend a lot of time playing on the bandstand and keep doing the things that work and do less of the things that don't.
 

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But it seems to me that the way to develop a sound is to spend a lot of time playing on the bandstand and keep doing the things that work and do less of the things that don't.
And play one mouthpiece, stick to it and learn to control and shape your sound so you can do what you want with it. Ideally something versatile enough that allows you to that to the extent that you want to. Obviously there may also be a psychological aspect to using the mouthpiece as a player you want to emulate, but generally once you get to a certain level you should not need that.

Plus (especially) before you get to a certain level it isn't likely that using the same mouthpiece will get you even close to the same sound.
 

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I have gone through the same thing, so many great sax sounds to choose from but you can't do em all. I settled on a piece easiest to play in tune, and with good articulation. That was my first priority. It leans towards a Getz - type sound, which is my most preferred sound, and with that as my foundation I push it to try and get some of the other sounds I also like.

Now when I hear other players with great, but different sounds than me, I don't envy them or wish I sounded like that. I compliment them knowing that my sound is mine and it sounds good, too.
 

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Do people that have a distinctive sound really do that? I mean, try to select it from pieces of other players' sounds?

I think I have a distinctive sound on alto and baritone (not so much on tenor) and in my case I think it's developed into what it is, despite what I might have tried to do. Although to be honest, I have not tried very hard to push it one way or the other.

Don't you think that people with a very distinctive sound, just let it develop and there it was, rather than trying to sound like this guy or that guy or this part of that guy added to that part of this guy?

I mean, you're always going to pick up some things from anyone you listen to a lot. But it seems to me that the way to develop a sound is to spend a lot of time playing on the bandstand and keep doing the things that work and do less of the things that don't.
They definitely do. Hearing other players and liking what they do/sound like has been the way it was done since day one, and its a completely natural way. You can listen to players and easily hear who had the greatest influences on them, although it is abundantly true that in this process, they also developed their own sounds/styles. The most starkly clear demonstration of this in today's music is how the 'smooth jazz' players all sound alike and its hard to tell them apart. They hear the successful ones do it and they learn to do it. Also you have the 'bop' guys who pretty much all sound alike.
 

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Flip a coin. Seriously.

It won’t tell you the answer, but you’ll know which outcome you prefer.

Or, just pick one and set your course.

Don’t let others decide your fate. That is just setting the stage for failure, and then assigning the blame to someone else.

G’luck with YOUR endeavor.
 

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Players who have “their own sound” just play and sound how they sound...after lots of work dabbling in the sounds of others (as Neff said).
Seems like these two pieces steer you too much in one direction and lock you into a certain sound despite both being middle of the road pices that should allow a lot of flexibility and the ability to speak however you wish. Maybe you need to take the advice given and play the crap out of one mouthpiece making all of the sounds and only change when you find the things you really want in your sound but the piece can’t deliver...odds are that list is really short on both.
 

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Players who have “their own sound” just play and sound how they sound...after lots of work dabbling in the sounds of others (as Neff said).
Seems like these two pieces steer you too much in one direction and lock you into a certain sound despite both being middle of the road pices that should allow a lot of flexibility and the ability to speak however you wish. Maybe you need to take the advice given and play the crap out of one mouthpiece making all of the sounds and only change when you find the things you really want in your sound but the piece can’t deliver...odds are that list is really short on both.
Not having any money when you're starting out can have its benefits. When I was a young-un, I didn't have the money (or the internet) to buy and try a bunch of different pieces. So I learned how to play on one (or two), and what came out was what came out.

On the flip side, if you had a lousy mouthpiece, you were probably stuck with that one too.

So being broke might have been a blessing in disguise, but I can tell you that at the time it was quite effectively disguised.
 

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Torn between two tenors and two sounds on tenor
Lovin' both of you is breakin' all the rules ....

I hear this melody, when I read the title ......:love2: sorry not really helpful
 

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I would pick the mouthpiece that is easier for you to play, and play along with recordings of both players. Nothing wrong in emulating both of those greats, and in all likelihood you will come out sounding a bit like each - maybe your sound will tend more to one player, and your lines and phrasing might tend to the other. I remember thinking this about a young Eric Alexander when he was just getting started. He did some very Dexter-like things with his sound, but his lines were more George Coleman-like.
 

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Don't you think that people with a very distinctive sound, just let it develop and there it was, rather than trying to sound like this guy or that guy or this part of that guy added to that part of this guy?

I mean, you're always going to pick up some things from anyone you listen to a lot. But it seems to me that the way to develop a sound is to spend a lot of time playing on the bandstand and keep doing the things that work and do less of the things that don't.
+1. I think this is pretty close to what happens. Here's my take on it after spending years trying to get the sound/tone quality of various favorite players, with rather limited success:

No doubt many, or most, players at some point try to emulate and sound like one or more of the players who have a sound they like. And some may come close, but in most cases it won't happen unless the sound they are going after is a very generic type of sound or heavily influenced by electronic enhancement (as in the case of a lot of smooth jazz players, maybe...). So in the best case scenario, you end up with a good sound that might have a few elements, especially things like phrasing or 'special effects' borrowed from others, but overall you develop your own distinct sound and as turf says, it just sort of develops over time. And this is a very good thing, overall, both for the player and the audience. Otherwise there would be scores of players all sounding the same. That's really the beauty of the saxophone; no two players really sound identical and wildly different-sounding players can still sound great. Variety is the spice of life, to cite an old, but true, cliche.
 

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Eventually you will end up sounding like yourself anyway no matter what gear you use. So why not pick the piece you feel most comfortable on Especially if you noticed that "it makes the improvising flow easier". that way you can concentrate on the music and not even think about things like gear. Having said that I too switch sometimes between a good HR link and a good metal one. but not every week or month or even year. I played on the TM EB hr link ever since I got it 6 years ago until recently I got a nice STM which I am planning on playing the years to come. I loved the comment "just listen to Gene" ... good example of a very big tone from a HR piece...
 

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Exactly, I'm glad you had the courage and common sense to say everything you did.

Eventually you will end up sounding like yourself anyway no matter what gear you use. So why not pick the piece you feel most comfortable on Especially if you noticed that "it makes the improvising flow easier". that way you can concentrate on the music and not even think about things like gear. Having said that I too switch sometimes between a good HR link and a good metal one. but not every week or month or even year. I played on the TM EB hr link ever since I got it 6 years ago until recently I got a nice STM which I am planning on playing the years to come. I loved the comment "just listen to Gene" ... good example of a very big tone from a HR piece...
 
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