Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hie everyone

There's too much of "bubbling" saliva sound in the mouth piece when i blow the sax. How can I improve this situation?Does this show a problem with my embrochure or what? When i asked my teacher about this he simply told me that i have to practise more to make that sound go away...is it true?

Thanks :)
 

·
Forum Contributor 2009 & Mouthpiece Patch Mogul
Joined
·
4,054 Posts
There`s lots of info under the search button but a few pointers:

Start off with a comfortably dry mouth. Take "swallow" breaks when you can. Don`t play down into the sax - keep your chin up which will prevent saliva running forward. Don`t eat immediately before playing. Common sense things really. Your teacher is right, you`ll learn to play without this happening, or at least minimise it, but he should also be giving you tips on how to deal with it.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
825 Posts
o.k. before you play clean out the neck and the mouthpiece. You can use warm water and just a little soap and some sort of brush, rinse thoroughly. If you use a mouthpiece patch clean around it. blow some air through it without the reed. Blow some air through the octave on the neck.You can even clean the reed and make sure the back of the reed is "slick" and wet-but not excess water. Perhaps you may be surprised at the buildup of grime or whatever within. I cleaned out my neck the other day and found a small piece of paper in there. Give yourself this advantage. Then you can take it from there and address the embouchure situation if need be.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
1,207 Posts
I used to have this problem, and it still comes back if I use a too open mouthpiece and a stiff reed. It will go......... trust me. A bit of "wind and rain" is desirable, but not if it sounds like frying fish. Try a different brand and strength of reed. It is all about experimentation....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
680 Posts
I've seen with people that are beginners, or don't play a lot, that some will salivate when playing. Eventually your body figures out that just because something is in you are mouth you are not eating and there's no need to pre-digest the mouthpiece.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
647 Posts
crazydaisydoo said:
I used to have this problem, and it still comes back if I use a too open mouthpiece and a stiff reed. It will go......... trust me. A bit of "wind and rain" is desirable, but not if it sounds like frying fish. Try a different brand and strength of reed. It is all about experimentation....
My experience also. I've adjusted my embochure by tightening it up a bit and taking in just a bit more of the mouthpiece (in my mouth:D )
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
449 Posts
Pgraves said:
I've seen with people that are beginners, or don't play a lot, that some will salivate when playing. Eventually your body figures out that just because something is in you are mouth you are not eating and there's no need to pre-digest the mouthpiece.
Haha! That's hilarious! :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
928 Posts
Welcome :)

What you are experiencing is not unusual. Moisture trapped between the reed and mouthpiece is causing that sound. When listening to recordings, or watching video performances, you may hear the performer doing what you will read about next. When you set your embouchre to play a note pretend you are drinking through a straw and at the same time sharply inhale. If the first attempt doesn't work then try it again. With practice, it works.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
276 Posts
I'm just curious. What kind of mpc do you play? When I first started practicing hard my band director told me the same thing. I couldn't get it to go away either, until I tried a different mpc. The C* just doesn't cutt it for me. Try lots of things. You have to find out what works for you not everyone else. Ohh and it will go away just keep after it!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
718 Posts
Pgraves said:
I've seen with people that are beginners, or don't play a lot, that some will salivate when playing. Eventually your body figures out that just because something is in you are mouth you are not eating and there's no need to pre-digest the mouthpiece.
As a dentist, I see this quite frequently and i think pgravy is right on. Some folks salivate a whole lot more in response to a foreign object in their mouth. With patience, the salivation response will subside.

The other possibilty is that your teacher is having great fun at your expense. Teachers are like that. Your teacher may well me laughing his/her tail off with other teachers (or maybe your friends) about the kid with the bubbly saxophone. Something to think about....

.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
5,336 Posts
One of the things that is helpful is to draw the air back in quickly with the mouthpiece in the mouth in the rests in the music. That puts the moisture back where it came from.

Another thing I teach my students is to polish the back of the reeds. After wetting the reed as if you are going to play it, rub the reed on the inside cover of your band book on a perfectly flat surface like a laminated counter top. Rub in the direction of the grain back and forth rapidly. When it is getting smoother it will start to make a clicking sound. I usually do 50 to 75 strokes.

When done correctly the back of the reed will have a smooth mirror-like finish. The droplets of water will bead up on this surface (like a waxed car) and quickly roll off thereby eliminating the sizzling sound of the water staying on the reed. This not only makes reeds play with a clearer tone, but they play more responsively and last longer as well.

John
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top