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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I tend to generate too much moisture, especially when I practice. I just bought a new (and expensive) sax and here is how I'm protecting it.

1) I dry the reed, swab out the sax, MPC and the neck three times at the end every half hour of practice. I use music medic swabs.

2) At the end of an hour I do the above and use a pad dryer on the closed pads.

3) I use non-lint shove-its for both the sax and neck when horn is not in use.

Is there anything else I should be doing?
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Too musch moisture, Part 2

As I've said, I generate too much spit! After awhile, the high notes tend to close up and cetain other notes are sensitive. I've read some things on bio-feedback and apparently dogs can learn not to salivate --so why can't I?

I've worked on this a bit and it seems to work. While playing scales I think of the feeling of a dry mouth. The feedback is this appearance of this feeling.

Does anybody else do this? Any other ideas?
 

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Administrator note

Threads merged. There is no reason to have multiple threads going covering this topic.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Re: Administrator note

They are not the same topic, IMO, one is about protecting the sax, and the other is about how to cure the source. But you're the boss.
 

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Re: Administrator note

How much saliva do you produce when you're not playing the sax?
 

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Read this and have some sympathy - I have a slightly different problem - in as much as sometimes, when I am playing I can forget to swallow and can end up in a tricky situation. Don't suppose anyone else finds this?? Clare
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Re: Administrator note

How much saliva do you produce when you're not playing the sax?
I don't have drool running down my face normally, but it's a problem when I play. I don't think I'm hurting the sax anymore bcause of all that I do after practice is over. I'll give you an example: if I have too much moisture on the reed and in the neck , certain notes crack if you know what I mean. I think I may have cured this problem with just concentrating on the feeling of a dry mouth. We'll see.
 

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If you concentrate on feeling like you have a dry mouth won't your salivary glands take over and just produce MORE saliva?
Some people are just naturally 'wet' players. Just swab when you need to and don't over think the issue.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
If you concentrate on feeling like you have a dry mouth won't your salivary glands take over and just produce MORE saliva?
Some people are just naturally 'wet' players. Just swab when you need to and don't over think the issue.
I disagree. It can affect performance. Upper notes start sounding less clear for one thing - at least for me.
 

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I've been playing for 40 years and I do know that moisture can affect performance.
Like I said, Just swab it out when you need to and don't make it an 'issue'.
There could be other reasons for you excessive 'saliva'. Playing within an hour after eating/brushing teeth, Teperature/humidity level in your practice area, the plain fact that there is a 'foreign object' in your mouth....
If you thinik bio-feedback will cure it then go for it.
I won't suggest leaning a bit forward while practicing to allow gravity to help move the moisture away. That 'cure' would be to simple minded for someone of your advanced learning...
 

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Be careful not to let your tongue touch the reed unnecesserarily - that is unless you are starting the tone (attack) or are playing staccato.

Regards Bo
 
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