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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been getting into classical alto sax lately, but I'm having troubles finding an appropriate mouthpiece (don't we all). It's not so much that i can't find one, i just don't know what is acceptable in the classical world. I've heard classical is supposed to be dark, and i can achieve that REALLY(really) well with a Selmer Soloist (don't know why people think it's bright). However, for my county audition this year, im playing this piece:
. I'm feel that i sound too dark. I have a Selmer s90 as well(which is what nobuya is playing in this piece). It seems to have a bit of brilliance near the top which is nice, but it seems that is too bright "traditional" classical music. So my big debate is which of these sounds is "correct" in the classical world?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
a bit on the bright side. is it considered average for classical sax?

my sound with the soloist is a tad darker than this.
 

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solos with band/piano.
Everyone has a different opinion about what is dark. I consider the S90 to be too dark for concert band. The most popular concert band mouthpiece is the S80, by far. I'm trying the Vandoren AL4 for concert band. I don't like a very dark mouthpiece for concert band. I've even used a Meyer. Whatever you choose, you have to be able to control the volume so pick one you feel comfortable with. Concert band concerts usually include show music and standard medleys. There are many short alto solos and at times you have to be able to project over the band. There's a Sinatra medley we're playing at the next concert that has a sixteen bar written alto jazz solo. I'm using a Meyer for that entire concert. My band director likes the Meyer sound. Whatever you choose you really must be able to play dark or bright on the same mouthpiece. Different music requires different tones. The S90 in the 180 or 190 facing is used by many classical players as is the S80 C*.
Don't get too hung up with equipment. You can play any of these pieces bright or dark and loud or soft by manipulating your tongue position. You already own a Soloist and an S90. Get a box of Vandoren V12 #3 and make one of them work for you,
 

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a bit on the bright side. is it considered average for classical sax?

my sound with the soloist is a tad darker than this.
That's great. Use the soloist. I think that's the most beautiful sound I;ve ever heard. I love the way he uses vibrato and the way sometimes he uses none. Don't strive to be average. Work on your own personal sound.
 

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Opinions and perceptions, personally I dislike most all modern mouthpieces to me they are way to bright. Those of us old enough remember the transition to brighter and brighter mouthpiece developments as they progressed through the 60's and 70's which coincided with amplified live music (you know, that evil rock and roll) yea designers made louder and brighter mouthpieces but tone, timber and color went out the window. Most sax players 40 and younger only have recordings to listen to to get an idea of what good tone actually is as they have been conditioned to the "sound" of the majority of mouthpieces of today.

JR
 
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