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Discussion Starter #1
I see this fairly often. Machine marks on toneholes but this is the worst I have seen on a horn made in Paris, France View attachment 25649 What is hiding under your pads?

Surprisingly the kangaroo pad had filled in the gaps so that maybe very little air escaped but the owner / player wasnt happy so there must have been some problem
 

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It's hard to tell from the photo. Looks to me like years of crud and corrosion are a bigger problem
 

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I have just 'burnished' or rather surfaced down some such like... Clean with vinegar and rag then 600 grit wet or dry followed by 800 glued to a mill flat proper width steel... carefully chamfer ( angle edge burnish or polish less than 45 degree ) inside and outside tonehole lip edge... Polish tonehole top with fine 3M Scotch Brite in light oil, clean with alcohol, then touch up lacquer finishes the work... reseat pad... play on...
 

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Looks like someone has had a go at it with a bastard file. Have fun getting these deep nicks out.
 

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A proper file is a true flat... with an abrasive sheet media it is a perfectly fine tone hole tool... I use handy machinist scrap pieces from a buddy... Ain't fun DP, just effacious... What do you use?
 

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BTW folks... effacious means 'it works'...
 

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Hehe I was just about to google "efacious."

There's a whole thread somewhere "discussing" different approaches. I think the rotary tone hole system that MusicMedic sells is about as good as I've seen. Depends on how good you are with hand tools I guess.
 

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Yes if your good at using a file correctly its quick & neat, the tonehole looked like a straightforward piece of repair work......seen a lot worse.
 

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Hehe I was just about to google "efacious."

There's a whole thread somewhere "discussing" different approaches. I think the rotary tone hole system that MusicMedic sells is about as good as I've seen. Depends on how good you are with hand tools I guess.
+1 For the diamond grit rotary files. I use mine under power like Curt does with my Milwaukee Cordless Screwdriver. It is light and on the low setting the rpm's are perfect. YES METAL IS REMOVED, AND IT IS ENTIRELY OK TO DO SO INSOFAR AS IT IS KEPT TO A MINIMUM----ESPECIALLY ON ROLLED TONEHOLES.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I would like to use the MM system but clearance ( to reach tonehole ) looks like would be a problme sometimes and $$$ I use optical glass blanks with sanding discs of 3 grits -- much cheaper but takes about 1 hour longer. Hurry can create more problems.. ask me how I know !

BTW that tonehole comes from a pro tech who overhauled horn. I would never replace a pad without levelling and truing the tonehole. Makes you wonder doesnt it ? I think he belongs to Napbirt too. So much for "take it to a tech" that I hear so much here on SOTW.

I would never use power on RTH -- too dangerous. Also I then narrow the edge to get a better seat. BTW who uses Conn-o-res pads now? Well I do and love them !

But what do I know...

Flame suit on ..
 

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Before removing any material I'd try to bring the low spots up with the aid of a tone hole plier (shape seen from the fron of the jaws should be like this: DD ) It looks to me like somebody may have "supported" the key from the underside with something metal and had a go bending the front of the cup so the pad sould seal. If this is the case you can "burnish up" some metal. Then a couple of passes with a diamond tone hole facer, then inspect the low/high areas and work the low up, then a pass with a good tone hole file (old E96 from feree's, or Bohem's or Kraus' ) and finishing with diamond, that would be my plan. You may want to check with your customer first, perhaps he likes how the horn plays now and if you fix this she/he'll be very angry ;)
 

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It looks to me like either damage done by a pad slick (by either manufacturer or a repairer?) or the tone hole edge has crashed against something before assembly, eg the tone hole edge of another sax, say hanging beside it during production.

To me it definitely does not look like file damage or machine damage.
 

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It looks to me like either damage done by a pad slick (by either manufacturer or a repairer?) or the tone hole edge has crashed against something before assembly, eg the tone hole edge of another sax, say hanging beside it during production.

To me it definitely does not look like file damage or machine damage.
Ditto, you wrote it down using way less words and ´proper terms (SLick, that was the one I was looking for)
 

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What do you use?
I have the MM diamond files (they are not really files, more like sanding discs) and the steel files from Boehm. I prefer the steel Boehm files for a better finish. When I use the MM files I often use the Boehm files after to finish. The MM diamond files are good and a great value IMO, much less expensive than the Boehm files. One issue with the MM files, the mounting of the Allen key is risky and can get stuck, resulting in misalignment of the file against the tone hole while operating (when used with the drill). I posted a thread about that, maybe you can find it by searching if interested.
 
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