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Alright, well I've been reading some random posts around here and stuff on the web and "today's classical sound" keeps popping up or something much the same. So, what is today's classical sound? I admit I don't listen to a ton of classical sax, but I do listen to some. I have Marcel Mule CD's and Sigurd Rascher CD's and Londeix doing the Creston Sonata. But apparently from what I heard, Mule's sound is outdated and not what today's sound is. That must go for Rascher too I would assume.

So, what should I be listening to/for and what should I try to imitate? And don't give me a "create your own sound" line. I at least want to know what a classical sound should sound like. The type of vibrato, articulation, etc.

It's just confusing to me because I don't understand how a classical sound can be out of date and change.

Thanks
 

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I would presume to define it, since it's by no means a singularity. If you want to know what the parameters of sound are that contemporary players refer to, I would urge you to add some of "today's" best players to your listening rotation:

Claude Delangle
John-Edward Kelly
Arno Bornkamp
Joel Versavaud
Vincent David
Habanera Quartet

Rather than providing any sort of exhaustive list here, look for these threads:

New Saxophone CD's
Classical Saxophonists Websites

Both are under the Classical Saxophone forum.

For a very comprehensive listing, check out Angel Negrin's extensive library of classical saxophone recordings at
http://www.cd-tracker.com/item_list_v2.asp?UserID=22398

Keep an open mind, avoid dogmatic positions, and happy listening!
JR
 

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1. drakesaxprof: you're an absolute darling to respond to the questioner as you do :)
2. Speaking as an ignoramus rather than an authority :) : I note that there are as many sax sounds as there are saxophonists. Through kind recommendations on this site I came across Daniel Gauthier, a magnificent contemporary "classical" player. Might be one place to start listening? "Today's classical sound " sounds like marketing fluff. As far as you are concerned, YOU are about as "contemporary" as it gets. As I said, I'm no expert.
 

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To Drakesaxprofs list, I'd add:

Eugene Rousseau (duh)
Steven Mauk
Lawrence Gwozdz (or however you spell it)
Michael Hester (you'll need to direct order his CDs)
Kenneth Tse


There are so many great players out there, it's tough to pick just a few...It would be easier to write about who NOT to listen to :twisted:
 

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J.Max said:
To Drakesaxprofs list, I'd add:

Eugene Rousseau (duh)
Steven Mauk
Lawrence Gwozdz (or however you spell it)
Michael Hester (you'll need to direct order his CDs)
Kenneth Tse

There are so many great players out there, it's tough to pick just a few...It would be easier to write about who NOT to listen to :twisted:
Definitely listen to Michael Hester. Having studied with Rousseau, Sinta, Londiex, and others, he has a beautiful modern sound influenced by many of our warhorses. I'm not sure what you mean by "direct order" J.Max, but they can be found here:

http://www.amazon.com/American-Patc...895845?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1184303006&sr=8-11

or

http://cdbaby.com/cd/michaelhester

Best,
Wallace
 

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I would lean way more towards Don Sinta and Tim McAllister. Very robust, powerful, and extraordinarily moving saxophone playing. The two of them can stand up to any other classical solo instrumentalist on the planet.
 

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Delangle: The best classical saxophonist that has EVER lived! Absolute perfection...










Wallace: You`re alive? Email me!
 

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Good suggestions of course.

I think there is one dimension that differs almost universally between Rascher/Mule and almost all modern saxophonists - amplitude (width) and speed of vibrato (OK, maybe that's two). Rascher's was wide and slow (at least in the second half or so of his career), Mule's wide and fast. Today, and for the past many years, saxophonists tend to use narrower vibratos and the speed, though very variable, tends to be somewhere between Rascher's and Mule's.

I've personally always thought Sinta had the most beautiful vibrato.
 

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You also could listen to this SOTW member, James Romain. There are very nice sounded stuffs on his website!
 

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Robenco, after you listen to a fair amount of these great suggestions, you'll realize that there's no such thing as today's classical sound. Even within the same "schools" you will find wide variations and cross-pollination of concepts. I'd say we are 50 years away from even being close to a single "sound". I'm not sure we'll ever get there -or want to, though I guess it's possible.

For tenor, compare

James Houlik
Claude Delangle
Steve Mauk
John Moore

Two of them are mainly alto players.

Also, on alto, John Harle is well-recorded.
 

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For alto, anything by Jean-Yves Formeau will be great. On the other side of the spectrum, Lawrence Gwozdz is a fantastic player as well. His latest Handel cd has some of the most beautiful playing I've heard. For soprano, I'd suggest Steven Mauk's cd, and tenor, anything by Houlik.
 

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Amen on the recommendations for the Jean-Yves Fourmeau Quartet and James Houlik.
 

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Wallace said:
Definitely listen to Michael Hester. Having studied with Rousseau, Sinta, Londiex, and others, he has a beautiful modern sound influenced by many of our warhorses. I'm not sure what you mean by "direct order" J.Max, but they can be found here:

http://www.amazon.com/American-Patc...895845?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1184303006&sr=8-11

or

http://cdbaby.com/cd/michaelhester

Best,
Wallace
I just meant that his CDs aren't found in a lot of stores. He has a RIDICULOUS pedigree, having studied with Larry Teal (in high school!), Eugene Rousseau, Don Sinta, Elizabeth Ervin, and Jean-Marie Londeix...not that it would mean anything if he couldn't play. He's possibly the best player that I've ever heard live, and I've heard quite a few. There's just something about his sound that just seems to hit you and envelop your ears...it's pretty incredible.
 

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My favorites for each instrument are:

Soprano: Carina Rascher
Alto: Delangle
Tenor: Sinta--Yes, Sinta(Have you heard is Bolero? You`ll cry its so beautiful)
Bari: Karl Knox


Within each of the saxophone from the family, there are so many different sounds and methodologies...If you`re listening to great players--you can`t go wrong...
 

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There's an old Detroit Symphony album called "French Favorites." It's got all of the warhorses, but on Bolero, a very young Don Sinta (I believe this was in the mid-60's) is playing tenor. I'll back Nitrosax up on this one. He sounds absolutely beautiful (of course, it is Sinta).
 

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Does anyone know the CD of Mario Marzi with the glazounov/ibert/milhaud/...? I think this CD is one of the best versions of all those concerto's I've ever heard... His sound is really superb on those CD's!
 

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Saxman is right...I think I got mine off iTunes--I had to dig thru about 3, 450, 876 different versions of Bolero to find it but...When I heard Sinta on tenor, I nearly passed out...He sounds great on alto as well-- don:t get me wrong-- but I:ve NEVER heard a tenor like that...it was more beautiful than a cello...
Its a shame he didn:t do more with the instrument...

Same goes for Karl...You:ve not heard classical bari til you hear Karl Knox
 
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