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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I understand that it is best to wait for an overhaul to straighten a sop due to the potential regulation issues that can arise. But I have also seen that some techs have a lot of luck with things falling back into place during a straightening.

I have an early 80s Keilwerth stencil sop that is bent forward about 3 mm with the main bend happening in the vicinity of the palm Eb and F pads. There is a small crescent-shaped dent along the left side of where the high E rod upper post meets the tube. I have used a picture of a different Keilwerth of the era to illustrate what's going on. The actual instrument does not have a high F#. Dotted line for the dent, curved line opposite where the bend is happening.

The 3 mm bend either didn't affect the action, or the action was regulated post-impact to fix things. If this is bent back it might need some fixing. By my uneducated count that might mean 3 rods have to be brought back in line, and maybe the palm keys fixed.

I've had people tell me this amount of bend is something no one notices and that some techs would be glad to get this close when fixing a bend.

Should I learn to live with it, or is my perfectionistic yearning for straightness worth risking the extra work involved?

Musical instrument Reed instrument Wind instrument Brass instrument Woodwind instrument
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Semi-working, has some leaks, needs about $300 worth of pads and adjusting.
 

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Straightening a soprano is not as big a deal as straightening a baritone (particularly one that needs to have the pigtail de soldered and than resoldered).
Any other money spent on adjustments without sorting this issue would be wasted.
 

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Right, I don't see why $300 should cover both some pad replacement/regulation AND body straightening....for goodness sake it takes maybe 5 minutes, tops. Maybe a tech would add $25-50 to the work....
 

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From my perspective - it is possible that a slight body bend may cause some unnoticable hinge rod hinge tube binding which - in the long term - could cause you (or the horns next owner) some grief. "I" would have this rectified - if only for peace of mind. I am sure "most" half-decent woodwind tecnnicians would sort this out for you without too many issues.
 

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I was taught that straightening the body with the keys attached is often the best approach. Even then it can open a "can of worms" with key and rod straightening and key fitting. "Everything affects everything" was a saying I learned in a woodwind repair clinic which has helped me over the years.
 
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